List compiled by Patsy Bradford, Director, Sevier County Heritage Museum, in 1997.

Note:  Issues of this newspaper are incomplete!

Additions and corrections to this list may be sent to
Ms. Bradford by using the Contacts link in the Menu.



July 14, 1897

Death's Doings

On Friday night, June 25th, little Stella Beale, the ten month old daughter of A. M. and Blanche Thomas, passed from this troublesome world into the home prepared for the sweet innocents.

On Friday night, June 17th, at his Catlettsburg home, Berry Henry, a popular and enthusiastic politician, well-known to Sevier countians, surrendered to the king of terrors.

Mrs. Serna C. Bowers, of New Street, one of the oldest and most highly respected ladies of Sevierville, died Sunday night, June 27th, shortly before 9 o'clock, after a lingering illness. Her loving and admiring children did all they could to relieve her suffering in the vain hope of getting her restored to health, but without success. She was laid to rest in the Post Oak Cemetery, Tuesday, June 27, where a large concourse of sorrowing relatives and sympathizing friends paid her the last sad tribute of respect. She was 71 years old having been born April 27, 1826. Her children, J. D. Bowers, J. E. Bowers, W. H. Bowers and Vina McCroskey were all with her at the time of her death.

Rachail Allen, daughter of Dan Allen, of Allensville, died Wednesday evening June 9, at about ten o'clock, from a lingering attack of consumption. The family physician, the family and kind friends did all they could to alleviate her suffering, but death was her only relief. She was interred in the Allen Cemetery, Friday at 10 A.M., funeral service by Rev. J. F. Hale.

Ellen Goforth, wife of Perry Goforth, died at the home of her father, Rufus Patterson, on West Main Street, Thursday, June 10th, at 11 a.m. She had been suffering quite a while with consumption, but bore her afflictions with a Christian patience which passes all understanding, rejoicing in the name of the Lord and she continued happy to the end. She was buried in the Alder Branch Cemetery the afternoon of the following day. Services were conducted by Rev. J. F. Hale who had frequently visited her during her sickness.

D. F. Pollard. An old and highly respected citizen of the 12th District, died Saturday, June 12th, after an illness of three months. Mr. Pollard was a quiet, unassuming citizen, strictly honest and highly esteemed by all who knew him. He was an extensive farmer and trader and for a few years engaged in the mercantile business. He was always frank and bold and never made a promise which he did not stand to. He was interred the following day in the McClary Cemetery. Services conducted by O. E. Underwood.

On Sunday, June 27th, wife of Absolem Allen, of Fair Garden, died quite suddenly.

Mrs. Amanda Shelly, of Shiloh Church, grandmother of J. W. Shelly, died Monday June 28th.

Catherine Christopher, wife of William Christopher, died Monday, June 28th, after a brief illness.

Amanda Eledge, an inmate of the county poor house, died Wednesday, July 1st.

Nancy A. Henry of the Eighth district, died on Sunday, June 27th, at the advanced age of 73 years, two months and nine days. She had been blind for thirty years and for the last few years had been quite feeble. She was a devoted Christian from girlhood, and one of the noblest of mothers. She was interred in the Shady Grove Cemetery, Monday June 28th. Funeral services by Rev. J. A. Baker.

Green B. Nations. A former Sevier countian, but late a resident of North Salem, Mo. died Thursday, May 21, after a sickness of eleven days duration. Mr. Nations was about 54 years of age. He served in the Sixth Tennessee Infantry during the late war and made a good soldier. His wife died about three years ago. He leaves three children who were with him in his western home. He was a quiet, unassuming man and a consistent member of the Primitive Baptist Church.


August 4, 1897

Death of Mary Roberts, eldest daughter of James and Mary Roberts of the fourth district, died July 20. She was born in February, 1860, was devoted member of the M. E. Church and was esteemed by all who knew her as a Christian lady. Friday night, July 16, she took a spasm and would have fallen had not her sister Maggie caught her in her arms. A few minutes after she was seized by the spasm she became speechless and remained so until her death, Tuesday morning at 8 o'clock. She was buried in the Middle Creek cemetery Wednesday, July 21, the funeral service being conducted by E. M. Wynn.

Death of A. J. Breeden of May, Friday evening, July 31st, in Knoxville. Some time ago he swallowed a goober pea, which, going in the wrong direction, necessitated the performance of a surgical operation. During all the time he lived he bravely fought the grim monster and claimed all the while that he would recover. He was interred in the Willard cemetery Sunday August 1, with appropriate ceremonies.


October 20, 1897

James H. Ballard Esq. of New Knob Creek died Monday evening Oct. 18th at two o'clock and was interred in the Zion Hill Cemetery Tuesday evening. Mr. Ballard was one of the leading citizens of Sevier County. At the time of his death he was tax assessor for his district and post master at his place. He had been suffering from a cancer quite a while and death was the only relief. The Vindicator extends its sympathy to the bereaved widow and children.


November 3, 1897

Josie Wear Dead. Sunday morning, October 31, the King of Terrors called at the residence of J. A. Wear, of Henderson's Springs, and claimed for its victim the wife and mother and left a husband and daughter to mourn the loss of life's dearest and best friend. Mrs. Wear was a model woman, a devoted wife and a loving mother. She had been for sometime suffering from the dreaded disease, consumption, but through it all she manifested a Christian patience and forbearance unsurpassed. She was laid to rest in the Shiloh cemetery Monday morning, receiving the last sad tribute of respect from sorrowing relatives and sympathizing friends.


Dec. 22, 1897

Nannie Douglass. Wife of Robert Douglass, of Millican, died at the residence of her father, Andrew Henderson, Monday night, Dec. 13, at 9 o'clock. She had been suffering from consumption some time and was recently seized with fever from which she could not recover. She was laid to rest in the Alder Branch Cemetery Tuesday evening, funeral services by Rev. J. F. Hale.



March 16, 1898

The friends of Hon. J. A. Householder sympathize with him in the loss of his sweet little babe which died last week of meningitis.

Friday evening, March the 11th, the wife of John Large, in the vicinity of New Era, was suffering excruciating pains and the family physician was called for. Mrs. Large died in an hour upon the arrival of the physician. She was laid to rest in the Shiloh cemetery with appropriate ceremonies, Sunday evening.

Frederick Jackson Shults was born Feb. 15, 1813. Professing religion at the age of 13, he joined the M. E. Church and lived a consistent member of the same until his death, which occurred Sunday night March 13, 1898. The bereaved widow with whom he has lived happily for 65 years and the fond children he has raised, have our sympathy in the trying ordeal. He was interred in the Pigeon Forge Cemetery, Monday evening in the presence of a large crowd of sorrowing relatives and sympathizing friends, funeral services by Rev. M. A. Rule. Brother Rule spoke quite feelingly of the life and character of the deceased and especially of his devotion to his church and his family.


March 30, 1898

Dan Layman of Pigeon Forge, died Friday, March 25, after an illness of eleven days. He was seized with fever Monday night, March 14, and Dr. S. W. Flanagin, the family physician was called in. As soon as he arrived Dr. Flanagin saw that the disease was aggravated by several complications and told the family that recovery was exceedingly doubtful, and if they wanted to call another physician to do so. The doctor and family did all they could to alleviate his sufferings, but death was his only relief. Mr. Layman was near 47 years of age, a high-toned christian gentleman, an industrious, honest citizen, an obliging neighbor, a loving husband and indulgent father. He was laid to rest in the Pigeon Forge Cemetery Saturday, March 26, funeral services under the auspices of Pigeon Forge Lodge No. 70 I.O.O.F., of which he was an honored member. He leaves a widow and a daughter near fifteen years old and one son who is grown and married. He will be missed from his happy home, from his busy community, from his lodge and the church and the Sunday School. The bereaved family and sorrowing friends have our sincerest sympathy.

Mrs. G. W. Caton, of Sutton, died at her home on Upper Cosby, last Sunday afternoon at 4:25 after an illness of several months, leaving a loving husband and five children to mourn her loss.

Job (Bud) Wardell of the Ninth district, died Sunday morning at 9 o'clock, and was buried at Boyd's Creek Cemetery Monday. He had been afflicted for two years with consumption, was a consistent member of the Baptist Church and an exemplary young man.


April 27, 1898

John Walker. Mr. John Walker, of Fair Garden, died about 5 o'clock Friday morning, April 22d, 1898. He had been suffering for some time from consumption and his death was not unexpected. He was a successful business man and succeeded in amassing a considerable fortune. He was the father of a large family, leaving a widow and nine children, who keenly feel the loss of a loving husband and an indulgent father. He was buried Saturday, at 10 a.m. in the Fair Garden cemetery, under the auspices of Mountain Star Lodge No 197, F. & A.M. He was a frank, honest man who never tried to deceive his fellow man.

Mrs. Dr. J. H. DeLozier. Saturday night, April 23d, 1898, the death angel visited the home of Dr. J. H. DeLozier, of Cosby, and took from the scenes of action the wife and mother. She had eaten her breakfast in the morning and was apparently in the best of health. In the afternoon she was seized with apoplexy and at eleven o'clock died. Mrs. Delozier was a model woman, kind to all she met. She leaves a husband and two small children who mourn for wife and mother, nearest, dearest and best friend. She was laid to rest Monday in Post Oak cemetery where a large concourse of relatives and friends paid her their last sad tribute of respect. Dr. Delozier and his children have our sympathy in this their sad affliction.

C. W. McMahan left Monday night for the bedside of his brother, R. H. McMahan, who is suffering from lead poison at Carthage, Missouri, and is not expected to recover. Later. -- Mr. McMahan died on last Monday.

Fornie McMahan, Dead. Mrs. D. C. McMahan, of Catlettsburg, died Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock, after an illness of over a week. She gave birth to a babe last week which died soon after its birth. Kind friends and the family did all in their power to restore her to health, but all in vain. Mrs. McMahan was a loving wife and an indulgent mother, a kind neighbor and a devoted Christian. The funeral will take place today (Wednesday) at the Alder Branch cemetery. Mr. McMahan and his children have the sympathy of the community.


May 25, 1898

David Crockett McMahan was born Jan. 25th, 1859. He was married to M.C.C. Howard Sept. 13, 1877, unto them were born nine children, Ollie, Dixie, James, Ethel, Leona, Jennie, Willie, Julia and Katie Cleo, all of whom except the last still live. Their union was a happy one and their home was pleasant to visit. Providence seemed to smile upon them and they had only recently purchased the beautiful farm upon which they died. April 18, Mrs. McMahan gave birth to a baby which lived one day and died, she suffered intensely until April 26, when the death angel called and took her home. Mr. McMahan waited upon her incessantly day and night. Saturday, April 30th, he was feeling exhausted and was suffering intensely with a pain in his right arm. He asked the attending physician to give him something to give him relief at once, the doctor made an injection in the front part of the arm just above the elbow, from which blood poison set in. His arm swelled to unusual portions and he suffered intensely -- many times he was thought to be near death's door, while at other times he would rally and his friends would have hopes of his recovery, but Saturday, May 21, at 12:45 p.m., death claimed him as her own. His mother, Leah McMahan, of Richison Cove, was with him at the time of death, as well as through most of his sickness. He has four brothers who survive him, T.D.W. McMahan, of Middle Creek, John M. McMahan, Pigeon Forge, Robert A. and Horace M. McMahan, Richison Cove. He was a devoted husband, an indulgent father, and an obliging neighbor, a consistent member of the church and a useful citizen. He was laid to rest in the Alder Branch Cemetery, Sunday, by the side of his loving wife who had preceded him scarcely a month. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. M. A. Rule, and were attended by a vast concourse of sorrowing relatives and sympathizing friends. The bereaved children have our profound sympathy.

Adolphis Brewer, of Henderson's Springs, died Saturday night, after an illness of four days. The interment was made at Shiloh Cemetery, Sunday Evening.


June 1, 1898

Mac Clabough, of Pigeon Forge died, Thursday, May 26th, after a lingering illness from dropsy. He was buried in the Middle Creek cemetery Friday. Funeral services by Rev. M. A. Rule. Mr. Clabough was a quiet unassuming citizen.


June 8, 1898

An old land mark gone. Elijah Henderson Passes Away at a Ripe Old Age Tuesday afternoon, June 2nd, at 2 o'clock, the news passed from house to house in the quiet village of Henderson's Springs, that Elijah Henderson, the oldest and one of the most highly respected citizens of that community, had yielded to the inevitable and gone to a better land than this. Mr. Henderson was past his three score-and-ten and had been an invalid for several years. For a few weeks past he has been quite ill and his death was not unexpected. He leaves a widow, two daughters and four sons, all of whom were at his funeral except Mrs. G. B. Sharp, of Rockford, who has the fever, and Samual Henderson who was watching at the bedside of a dying wife. He was laid to rest Friday morning in the Shiloh cemetery. Funeral services were conducted by Revs. J. B. Seaton and M.A. Rule. Brother Seaton spoke quite feelingly of the life and character of the deceased and of when they and others were boys together attending church and burials at that same place in boyhood's happy days. He asked inquiringly how many of us are here today. A look at the faces of the audience told that less than a dozen of the playmates of his boyhood were present. Mr. Henderson was not a member of any church, but was always a moral, upright citizen. Some years ago he made a profession of religion and thence forward lived an exemplary life and seemed at all times entirely designed to the will of Him who doeth all things well. His life was that of a model gentleman, he attended strictly to his own business and had not an unkind word for any. To his neighbors he was always kind and obliging, no deserving case of charity was ever turned empty handed from his door. He was the youngest of a large family, all of whom, except one sister, Mrs. Martha Swann, of Dandridge, have preceded him to eternity. His widow, his children and grand children have our sympathy in this sore affliction.

Sallie Henderson, wife of Sam Henderson, of Henderson's Springs, died Saturday evening, June 4th, 1898, after a lingering illness from consumption. She was a daughter of A. A. Runyan, Esq. She was a member of the Baptist Church, was a loving wife and mother, a kind and obliging neighbor and a [illegible]. She was laid to rest in the Shiloh cemetery Sunday afternoon with appropriate services by Rev. J. F. Hale, Rev. J. B. Seaton and J. M. Parsons. The interment was attended by a vast crowd of sorrowing relatives and sympathizing friends. Her aged father and mother, her bereaved husband, her three brothers and her two surviving sisters have our sincerest sympathy in this sad bereavement. Sallie was an obedient daughter, a kind sister, a devoted wife and a loving mother. May her loved ones all meet her in the better land is our wish.

Elbert S. Thompson, an old and highly respected citizen of this county, but lately of Arkansas, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. E. J. Rogers, of Henderson's Springs, Monday, June 6th, about noon. Mr. Thompson had been quite unwell for some time and death was not at all unexpected. His daughter and his wife together with the attending physician and several kind friends did all in their power to alleviate his suffering, but death was his only relief. He was a good citizen, a loving husband, an indulgent father and a devoted Christian. His loved ones who were near him to the end together with those in the state west of us, have our sympathy in this, their sad bereavement. He was buried in the Shiloh cemetery Tuesday morning.

Margarett Franklin, wife of Rev. N. W. Franklin, of Banner, died Sunday morning, June 5th, 1898, at 12:10, after an illness of three weeks, and was buried the afternoon of the same day in the Maples' cemetery, funeral services by Rev. J. N. Clabaugh. She leaves a husband and five children who deeply feel the loss which can never by repaired.

Mrs. Anna Benson of Grapeton, died Friday evening, June 3d, 1898, at 4 o'clock after a lingering illness. She had been afflicted for more than four years, but bore her affliction with a Christian forbearance which showed her meek and lovely disposition. She was laid to rest Saturday afternoon in the Laurel Grove cemetery, funeral services by Rev. J. A. Baker and J. M. Parsons. Our sympathies go out to the bereaved children and friends.

Mattie Lane, wife of Sanford Lane, of Knoxville, died last week and was brought back to her home in the eleventh district, this county, for burial. She was a daughter of Mrs. R. R. Reagan, of Trentville, by a former husband.

A little daughter of Sam Hendersons, of Henderson's Springs aged one week, died Monday night.


June 29, 1898

Myrtle Trotter. The striking declaration "that in the midst of life we are in death," was forcibly illustrated last week. Myrtle Trotter, daughter of D. W. Trotter, owner of the the Trotter Telephone Co., the operator at Trotter's, the very picture of health, was seized Friday, June 17th with congestion of the stomach, from which she suffered intensely until Tuesday, June 21st, when she died. She was a little past 21 years of age having been born April 16, 1877. She was laid to rest in the Clark cemetery, five miles north east of Maryville the following day. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. J.A. Ruble, Rev. W. A. Catlett and Rev. Mr. Baize. A vast crowd turned out to pay the last sad tribute of respect to her, showing the admiration and esteem in which she was held by all who knew her. Mr. Trotter and his family have our sincere sympathy in this sad and unexpected bereavement.

Stella Springs Moore. The little daughter of Gideon and Ida Moore died at the residence of her grandfather, Jno. J. Emerit, Friday night, June 24, 1898, at the age of two and a half months. She was laid to rest in the Cate cemetery near Henry's Cross Roads, Saturday afternoon. Funeral services by Rev. M. A. Rule. The young parents have our sincere sympathy in this sad affliction which can be fully appreciated only by one having undergone a similar affliction.

Mrs. J. C. Nichols of Mossey Creek, died Saturday, June 11th, after an illness of some months from tuberculosis of the stomach. She leaves five children ranging in age from 14 years to 9 months. Her husband who is a brother of our townsman, G. W. M. Nichols, has the sympathy of many friends in and around Sevierville.



July 13, 1898

Susie Turner, wife of Elijah Turner, of the 7th district, died Thursday night July 7th, after an illness of two weeks from malarial fever. She was 41 years old, had been a member of the Baptist church at Millican Grove 25 years, had been married 20 years Feb. 15th. She leaves 9 children who with her devoted husband mourn an irreparable loss. She was buried Friday afternoon, in Alder Branch cemetery. Funeral services by Rev. J. F. Hale. The sympathies of the Vindicator are extended to Mr. Turner and his children.


July 27, 1898

Sudden Death. Monday morning about nine o'clock, Addie Dixon, wife of Luther M. Dixon, of Harrisburg, while talking to her mother, Mrs. Mary Robertson, suddenly died. She was somewhat indisposed, but was not considered dangerous. Her husband had gone to his work and her brother, M. C. Robertson, had gone to the woods to kill her a squirrel. She began to feel queer and commenced describing her feelings to her mother, but before she could complete description, she was dead. She and her husband had been married less than a year and seemed to be starting happily and successfully on life's journey. The young husband, the aged mother and admiring brothers and sisters have our sympathies. She was interred Tuesday at 10 a.m., with appropriate ceremonies.

Hattie Butler, wife of William, of Middle Creek, died Saturday night at 10 o'clock, after a lingering illness from consumption. She was a daughter of [incomplete].

W. H. Shults, of Pigeon Forge, was a member of the M. E. Church and was highly respected by all who knew her. She was interred in the Middle Creek cemetery Sunday evening. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. M. A. Rule. The bereaved husband and his four children have our sympathies.


Sept. 7, 1898

Martha Toomey Chandler, wife of John Chandler, passed away at 1:40 a.m. Saturday Sept. 3. Saturday morning the people of Sevierville and vicinity learned with regret that Martha Chandler, wife of our popular county court clerk was dead. Mrs. Chandler had been unwell all summer, but was not considered dangerous until Thursday morning. Wednesday night she passed a restless might, and Thursday morning complained of feeling worse. In the morning her mother came in and she exclaimed "there is mamma," and raised up and kissed her mamma. After that she never spoke intelligently. The family physician, the family and many sympathizing friends did all in their power to alleviate her sufferings. Her three daughters Mrs. S.W. McMahan, Mrs. R.H. Randles and Mrs. M.C. Thomas were all with her at the time of her death. Mr. Chandler is still weak from an attack of chills and fever and this is a severe tax on his weakened nerves. She was laid to rest Sunday morning in the family burying ground at Boyd's Creek, funeral services by Rev. H. C. Hamsted, who offered an affectionate and fervent prayer for the friends and relatives of the deceased asking that they be prepared to meet her in heaven. He spoke feelingly and pleasantly of his acquaintance with the deceased, having served as her pastor, both at Boyd's Creek and at Sevierville. He said that her life and her walk stamped her as an exemplary Christian, which is a stronger testimony than any profession or membership in the church. He said that he came not to talk to the dead, but to the living. Said he, nothing that we could say could change the dead. He then delivered an able and instructive discourse upon the resurrection of Christ. Looking down into the open grave of our friends, said he, the only consolation we have is that like Christ they will rise again. He closed with an able exhortation to those who had not an abiding father in Jesus Christ to prepare at once for the summons that awaits us all. A large crowd attended the funeral attesting the high esteem in which she was held by all who knew her. Mrs. Chandler was a daughter of the late S. O. Dickey and was born Sept. 5, 1850 and at the time of her death lacked only 2 days of being 48 years old. She was married to John Chandler Sept. 26, 1867. Rev. John H. Morton, Capt. of Co. K Third Tennessee Cavalry and Mrs. Chandler's old school teacher officiating. She and her husband lived happily together for nearly thirty-one years. Unto them, were born four children, Nellie, Kate and Blanche, and Robert Lee, who died at the age of two months in 1870. She was a devoted wife, an indulgent mother and a devoted Christian, loved and respected by all who knew her. Her aged mother, her bereaved husband and daughter, her loving grand children and many sorrowing and admiring friends have our sincere sympathy in this sad bereavement.


Sept. 14, 1898

Ellen B. Cox, wife of Hugh Cox, Esq. of the tenth district, died between 6 and 7 o'clock, Tuesday morning, September 13th. She had been unwell for quite a while but was not considered dangerous until Monday evening when her children who were away from home were dispatched for and the family and attending friends saw that the end was near. She was a daughter of James Black of Blount county, and was born April 7th, 1839. Professing religion at an early age, she united with the Presbyterian church, of which she was a consistent member until the time of her death. She was married to Hugh Cox, October 29th 1867, with whom she lived happily nearly thirty one years. Unto them were born five children all of whom have grown up and become useful members of society. The oldest son, John B. holds a responsible and profitable position with an electric light company in New York. Their only daughter, Miss Jennie, is one of the most popular teachers of our county. She was a member of the faculty of Murphy College from 1895 to 1897 and during the last year attended Centenary College, preparing for greater usefulness. J. A. Cox, another son, has been principal of Porter Academy since the fall term of 1897. Will, the youngest son is a graduate of Murphy College and is employed as salesman by the firm of J.R. & M. Yett. Sam, another son is a successful farmer and stock trader, is married and living at the Cox home. The family has been one of the happiest and most pleasant in the scope of our acquaintance. Father, mother and children vied with each other in making one another pleasant and happy. She will be interred in the Uceba Cemetery Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock. The funeral services will be conducted by Rev. Alexander, her pastor, who will be assisted by Rev. J.A. Ruble, Rev. M.A. Rule, and Rev. Mr. Spring and others. Words cannot express our sympathy to the devoted husband and admiring children, who mourn for wife and mother, life's dearest, noblest and best friend.

Harriet White Blair. Relict of Robert H. Blair, born Aug. 23, 1830. Died Sept. 5, 98. Mrs. Harriet Blair, relict of R. H. Blair, had been quite unwell for some weeks, from chronic liver and kidney trouble. Thinking the bracing air and the health restoring water of Line Spring would benefit her, her children took her to this celebrated summer resort, but she gradually grew worse and was brought home. The best medical aid of the country was procured and loving children and sympathizing friends made a gallant fight to restore her to health, but without avail. For two weeks death was hourly expected and at 9:20 of the evening of Sept. 5, called to claim his victim. Mrs. Blair was a daughter of the late Curtis Mills, who for a number of years was a member of the county court of Sevier county, and was a Justice in the strict sense of the term. She professed religion in 1845 and joined the Baptist church at Henderson's Chapel. In 1851, she was married to Robert H. Blair, with whom she lived until his death which occurred Jan. 2, 1894. Unto them were born 7 children, all of whom grew up and became useful citizens, her oldest son, M.L. Blair, died in the Spring of 1888, another son, H.C. Blair, lives in Sevierville, and is the junior member of the popular mercantile firm of Emert & Blair. A daughter, Mrs. F.L. Emert, also lives in Sevierville. Two sons, Frank and Joe live in San Antonio, Texas. Frank has twice represented his county in the lower house of the Texas legislature and is nominated for a third term. He is a candidate for speaker of the next house with flattering prospects for a selection. John is a member of the Texas state guards and is making an excellent record as a soldier. One daughter, Mary J. and one son, Lawrence T. have remained at home with their mother. Their home was one that it was a pleasure to visit. Every thing was neatly arranged and the visitor was always made welcome. Mrs. Blair was a faithful Christian, a devoted wife, an obedient daughter, an indulgent mother, an obliging neighbor, loved, honored, and respected by all who knew her. Her six children, and her surviving sister, Mrs. M.H. Emert of this place, were all with her at the time of death. She was laid to rest in the Middle Creek cemetery Tuesday with appropriate services. A large crowd of sorrowing relatives and sympathizing friends turned out to pay the last sad tribute of respect to one they dearly loved.


Dec. __, 1898

Ellen R. McCroskey, wife of E.E. McCroskey, died at her home, corner of Walnut and Vine streets, Knoxville Tennessee, Monday December 5th, at 1:30 p.m., after a protracted illness from consumption. She bore her afflictions patiently believing all the while that she was not afflicted with consumption but would recover. She was a daughter of Mrs. Mary E. Chandler of Boyd's Creek, and a sister of John Chandler our popular County Court Clerk. Mr. McCroskey is a Sevier countian also, but has been in business in Knoxville quite a while. The husband, mother, brothers and sisters and other relatives of the deceased, have our sincere sympathy.

Nancy DeLozier, wife of James DeLozier of the tenth district died Saturday after a brief illness. Deceased was a high-toned Christian lady and leaves a host of friends to mourn her death.

Henry Chandler, a respectable old colored man of this county died at the home of Bob Brabson of Boyd's Creek Friday evening.


December 21, 1898

Andrew Latham, an old and highly respected citizen of the tenth district died quite suddenly Thursday, Dec. 15th from heart failure. Mr. Latham had been an exceedingly stout man hardly ever being sick. He was a member of the M. E. Church an honest upright gentleman, a man of strong convictions and frank in all his expressions giving all to understand his position on men and measures. He was the father of a large family and leaves a host of relatives and friends who linger sorrowfully at his tomb.

Ethel Templeton. The sixteen year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Templeton of Knoxville died at their home last week after a brief illness from pneumonia fever. The bereaved parents and sorrowing brothers and sisters have the sympathy of many Sevier County friends, who knew them when living here and who have come in contact with them upon subsequent visits to the county.



January 11, 1899

Callie Webb, of Rainbow, died Wednesday night January 4th, and was buried in the Thomas cemetery Friday morning. She was a daughter of Perry Webb, was postmaster at Rainbow and was deservedly popular with all who knew her. The family have our sympathy in their sad bereavement.


January 18, 1899

G. W. M. Nichols, of this place died at his residence on East Main Street, Monday night, Jan. 16th, near nine o'clock. He had been sick only about ten days. His suffering was intense. His family, the family physician and many kind friends did all in their power to alleviate his sufferings and save his life, but to no avail. The deceased was raised on a farm three miles southeast of Sevierville. In early life he professed religion and joined the M. E. Church, South, of which he was a consistent and devoted member until his death. He married Mary Catlett, daughter of the late Henry Catlett. Their union was a happy one, seven children survive him. Mr. Nichols was a tinner by trade and was recognized by all who knew him as a very honest contractor. He always evinced?? a deep interest in public affairs and always took a positive position. His influence was always exerted for what he believed to be the best interest of christianity, good morals, and good government. His place will be badly missed. The wife has lost a loving husband, the children an indulgent father, the aged mother a dutiful son, and the brothers and sister a brother truly beloved, the church has lost one of its most faithful attendants and staunch supporters, and our town and county a good citizen. He was born July 9, 1847, and was at the time of his death fifty-one years, six months and seven days old. He will be buried in the Shiloh cemetery today (Wednesday Jan. 18) funeral services by Revs. W. W. Pyott and M. A. Rule.

Cynthia Mitchell, wife of W. P. Mitchell, of Knoxville, died Thursday night, Jan 12, at 10:30, from spinal meningitis, having been sick only twenty-four hours. Mrs. Mitchell was a native of Kentucky and was married to her husband in the spring of 1890. She and her husband lived happily together until the time of her death. Funeral services were conducted Saturday morning at the Broad Street M.E. church, South, after which she was interred in the Woodlawn Cemetery south of the river. The many friends of Mr. Mitchell in Sevier County deeply sympathize with him in this sad bereavement.

Margaret Wade, wife of Hon. J. J. Wade, of Boyd's Creek, died Sunday night Jan. 16 after a lingering illness from cancer. She bore her affliction with the patience becoming a Christian She leaves a husband and six children who have the sympathy of the entire community.


January 25, 1899

Mary Coleman, daughter of Nan Coleman, died at 4 p.m. Thursday, January 19, from spinal meningitis. Deceased was about 15 years of age and was a very popular young lady. She was interred in the colored cemetery the following day with appropriate ceremonies.


February 1, 1899

Obituary. By request and by reason of a long acquaintance, and personal friendship, the undersigned friend pays this last tribute of respect to the memory of Jesse Stafford, deceased. Jesse Stafford was born July 25th, 1818, and died January 20th, 1899, at the age of eighty years, five months, and 25 days. He was left an orphan when but a child, with little or no means of this world and with no one to care for him, the county court of Sevier County, Tenn., bound him to John Howard, an honored citizen. He labored on the farm and grew up to be an industrious and good citizen. At about the age of 20 years, Mr. Stafford was married to Elizabeth Thurman. They went to housekeeping with little to help them start in life, but by industry economy in a good long life, they acquired a good living and gave in their lifetime a good start to each of their eight married children. They had born to them thirteen children, three of whom died while in childhood, and ten were raised to years of maturity, four boys and six girls. Mr. Stafford lived to see buried all of his boys, and his wife, who died eight years ago, and he left five daughters to survive him. His wife, a helpmeet in deed, was industrious and economical, and while he looked well to the farm or other relations of life, she cared for the household affairs. Some time after the death of his wife, he was again married to Mrs. Virginia Layman, with whom he lived until his death. Mr. Stafford was a member of long standing in the Baptist church. He lived the life of a Christian and honored the church of his choice. He was lead by a conscience that made him "Do unto others as he would have others do unto him." He was buried in the family graveyard near Walnut Grove church. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. John Russell, a life long friend, who by reason of age will soon follow his deceased brother. The deceased had a reputation for honesty, an excellent character, and was a man of fine natural sense; and while his education was limited, he had good business qualifications. Mr. Stafford served the people of Sevier County as deputy sheriff, Trustee and Justice of the Peace, all of these trusts he filled with satisfaction to the county and honor to himself. He tried to live up to the Proverb: "Owe no man anything," and was always very punctual in paying his debts.

John Jackson Penland. "Jack" Pendland, as he was familiarly and widely known throughout this community, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Sarah O'Dell, at Bridgeport, Friday, January 12, after a lingering illness of two weeks with lagrippe. Mr. Penland was born near Asheville, N.C. on December 20, 1814, and at the age of 19 his father moved to this county settling on Big Creek and brought his son with him, bother, father and son spending the remainder of their days in the sections where they originally located. To the occupations of blacksmithing and farming Mr. Penland divided his time, and his skill and ability in each of his occupations was favorably known the country around. His blacksmithing he abandoned a number of years ago, but his garden and fields received his constant care up to the time of his death, his vitality being somewhat remarkable, and retaining with but little diminution all the fire and vigor of his youth. On January 20th, 1846, he was united to Miss Nellie Justus, a daughter of the late Reuben and Mary Justus, and to them fourteen children were born, all of whom reached maturity and all but two of whom survive his death. On Wednesday before Christmas he started from his home afoot to spend Christmas with his son, W. H. Penland, at this place; stopping over night with his daughter, Mrs. Sarah O'Dell, at Bridgeport, and next morning was taken sick and unable to travel. Medical attention and careful attention was ministered to him, but to no effect, and he expired Friday, January 13th, in the 86th year of his age, his burial occurring in the Del Rio burying ground, Rev. George W. Coleman, of Newport performing the last sad rites. The deceased leaves a widow and twelve children to mourn his loss. His children are W. H. And A. W. Penland, of this place, J. R. Penland and Mrs. Eunice Trotter, of Sevierville, R. T. Penland, of Sheridan, Oregon, Mrs. Sarah O'Dell and Mrs. Alice Draper of Bridgeport, Mrs. Julia O'Dell, of Del Rio, and Misses Jan, Victoria and Dora Penland.


February 8, 1899

Margaret Compton an old and highly respected lady of the 16th district, died Tuesday January 31, and was buried in the Shiloh cemetery, Thursday February 2nd, funeral services by Rev. Caleb Rule. She was a member of the Baptist church and was near 100 years old.

Ella May, the little daughter of John H. and Delia Huff of Jones' Cove, died in Knoxville, Saturday evening, February 4. She was about 18 months old. She was brought back to Jones' Cove for burial.


April 12, 1899

Benajah Proffit, of Ogle's X Roads, died Saturday evening, April 8th, after a brief illness from pneumonia. His physician gave him an opiate and he quietly went to sleep and never waked. He was about 57 years of age, was a member of the Baptist Church and was an exemplary citizen. He leaves a widow, five sons and three daughters who have our sympathy in this hour of sorrow and bereavement. He was buried in the Proffitt Cemetery Sunday evening, services by Rev. J. W. Trentham.

John Lowman, of Henry's X Roads, died Sunday night April 2nd, after an illness of three weeks. He was about 70 years of age and was a highly respected citizen. He was buried the following day, services by Rev. W. W. Pyott.


February 15, 1899

Jay Ell Death. The death angel has visited our community once more and has taken away Malinda J. Roberts, wife of D. B. Roberts, on the night of February 4th, at 12 o'clock. She was buried at Roberts' School House cemetery February 6th. Services were conducted by Brother E. M. Wynn, who spoke relative to her past life, of being a good Christian and a good mother. Brother Wynn impressed the thought on the children's minds of being ready to meet her in heaven. She was born October 3rd, 1855, was married to her husband D. B. Roberts, April 23rd, 1874. Unto them were born ten children, three of whom preceded her to heaven. She was a daughter of James and Asa Emert, of Bird Creek. She has gone to meet her children and to be forever at rest. She professed faith in Christ when about 14 years of age, around the father and mother's hearthstone, and joined the M. E. Church at Caton's Chapel and lived a faithful Christian until death. Calling all her children to her bedside, she talked to them quite a while, telling them to meet her in heaven, that she was going there to rest forever, where there is no death, sin nor pain. May God bless the dear children and husband of the deceased.

Death of Miss Kate Trotter, daughter of H. B. Trotter of May Spring, died suddenly Tuesday morning February 7th. She had been unwell quite a while, but was not considered in danger of immediate death. She was about 16 years of age and deservedly popular and highly esteemed by all who knew her. The family have our sincere sympathy in this sad bereavement.


March 8, 1899

Ownby -- John B. Ownby, of Brier, died Saturday morning after a brief illness. He was abut 65 years old and a highly respected citizen.

Parton -- Lucinda, the youngest daughter of W. A. Parton, died at their residence 815½ Grand avenue, Knoxville, Friday, March 3rd. She was about 20 years of age and was well known and highly respected in and around Sevierville where she had grown up and attended school and church. The family moved to Knoxville last December. In January she was seized with meningitis and for nine long weeks the anxious family and sympathizing friends watched her beside day and night hoping that she might survive the dreaded disease, but each fond hope was followed by grim despair as each appearance of getting better was succeeded by symptoms of growing worse. While the end was not unexpected it came with a crash to her many friends in this vicinity who hoped that having survived so long she would ultimately recover. The many friends of Mr. Parton and his wife and surviving daughter throughout this county will deeply sympathize with them in their sad bereavement. The family and friends arrived in Sevierville Sunday afternoon about 4 o'clock and were entertained at the hospitable home of J. D. Bowers. During the evening many of the schoolmates of the deceased and friends of the family called and took a sad look at one who ? Three months ago the very picture of health. Monday morning the remains were taken to the M. E. Church, which was filled with sympathizing friends. Both schools turned out enmasse to pay the last tribute of respect to their schoolmates and students. Services were conducted by Rev. W. W. Pyott, who read the 15th chapter of Corinthians and offered a fervent prayer for the family and young acquaintances of the deceased, after which he made a few remarks upon the beauty of the Christian character and the happiness of the resurrection of the righteous. Brother E. M. Wynn spoke a few words concerning the life and character of the deceased and exhorted the young people who had been the schoolmates and acquaintances of the deceased to imitate her virtues and meet her in heaven. Prof. Craig spoke briefly of her work as a student, as a member of the Sunday school, of the Epworth League. In all her work she was diligent, honest and faithful and never shirked a task that was assigned her or a duty she was asked to perform. He felt that the entire school had been bettered by her example. She was taken to the Shiloh Cemetery and interred.

Birdett -- Nancy Birdett, mother-in-law of Rev. John B. Walker, of New Knob Creek, died Sunday morning. She was 86 years old last October and had been a remarkably stout woman. She was sick only a few days. She had been a member of the Baptist church over 60 years and was esteemed by all who knew her as a high toned Christian lady. She was laid to rest in the Shiloh cemetery Monday with appropriate ceremonies.


March 29, 1899

Pink M. Patterson, aged about 17, died at the Patterson residence on West Main street, Sunday morning, at 2 o'clock, after a lingering illness from consumption. He was interred Monday evening in the Alder Branch cemetery, services were conducted by Rev. W. W. Pyott.

Mira Murphy, wife of W. D. Murphy, of East Fork, died at their residence Wednesday morning, March 22. She had been quite unwell for some time and death was not unexpected. She was buried the following day in the Bethel cemetery with appropriate ceremonies. She was a devoted member of the Baptist church and highly esteemed by all who knew her.

John Sarrett, formerly of the county, died in Atlanta, last week from pneumonia. He was a prescription clerk of one of the leading drug stores of that city.



April 5, 1899

W. R. Trentham Dead. Gatlinburg, April 3rd. W. R. Trentham, a highly respected citizen and member of the Baptist church at this place died Saturday April 1st at 6 p.m., after a lingering illness. He was 36 years old. He was buried in the Evans chapel cemetery Sunday at 4 p.m. Services by Revs. R. Evans and J. W. Trentham.


April 19, 1899

An infant child of J. M. Kear, of Jay Ell, died April 14th. When the parents awoke from their slumber the little babe was dead in bed.

Lucinda Carter, wife of Madison L. Carter, of Walden, died Tuesday morning at 1 o'clock after a lingering illness. She was buried in the cemetery near the M. E. Church in the afternoon. She was a member of the M. E. Church, a loving wife and an indulgent mother. She leaves a husband and four children all of whom are grown and married

Major Charles Inman, died at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Nancy Stafford, of Fair Garden, Sunday morning April 9th. He was buried in the family cemetery Monday. Services by Rev. M. A. Rule. He was 89 years, 1 month and 29 days old. He made a gallant soldier in both the Mexican and Civil wars. He represented his county in the legislature and was always recognized as an honest high-toned gentleman and a good and upright citizen. He was a member of the M. E. Church. He was the father of ten children, six of whom have preceded him to the Spirit land. Truly a good man has gone. His surviving children, his grandchildren and other relatives have our sympathy in this sad bereavement.


April 26, 1899

Betty Cusick, of Cusick, relict of the late Andrew Cusick, died at the residence of her son, S. R. Cusick Monday night after a brief illness. She was past the three score years of age and a noble and highly esteemed woman.


May 3, 1899

Atchley, Clara, daughter of Thomas Atchley of Banner died Saturday, April 29th, at the age of 23 years, from pneumonia fever. Funeral services Sunday by Rev. J. N. Clabaugh.

McCroskey -- Mrs. Doc McCroskey, of Latonia, died Monday, April 24th, after a brief illness, leaving a husband and one child.

McCallie -- Mrs. A. J. McCallie, of Asbury died Friday, April 28th, and was buried the following day. Services by Rev. J. A. Ruble.

Faine -- Effie, the little daughter of J. W. Faine and wife, formerly of this county, died at their home, 941 McCammon St., Knoxville, Friday night. She was brought back and interred in the Sims' cemetery Sunday.

McBee -- John Condon, a little eleven-months old son of Dr. and Mrs. R. M. McBee, of Henry's Cross Roads, died Tuesday, April 25th, and was laid to rest the following day in the presence of a large concourse of sympathizing friends. Services by Rev. W. W. Pyott.

Brown -- A two-weeks-old girl of Cal Brown died Monday morning.

Pollard -- Charlie, son of Andrew and Pricilla Pollard, of Henry's Cross Roads, died Saturday, April 29th. Services by Rev. W. W. Pyott. Charlie was a bright boy full of promise, but God claimed him for His own just as he was blooming into manhood. He professed religion during the revival meeting at that place in March.

James Layman, Fair Garden, April 22d. Mr. James Layman, of Fox, Tenn., departed this life April 19th, 1899. Brother Layman was born in Sevier county on July 9th, 1812 and lived in said county for a number of years. On the 25th of January 1830, Brother Layman and Vina Fox were united in the bonds of matrimony. They lived an agreeable life up to July 20th, 1881. In the year 1882 Brother Layman and Jane Harrison were married, who still survives him. Brother Layman raised a large family by his first wife, the most of them survive him. Brother Layman started in the world very poor, but by hard labor and economy he gained a considerable quantity of this world's goods. He helped his children to take a start in life. He was an honest dealer, a kind and obliging neighbor. He helped to build churches and support the ministry. His doors were always open to the hungry. Brother Layman professed Christianity in the year 1873 and joined the M. E. Church and ? Christian, ever ready to lend a helping hand to the church and died happy and no doubt has gone to glory to wait the resurrection. Brother Layman leaves a wife and a host of children, grand children, kindred and friends to mourn their loss.


May 17, 1899

Trotter -- Mackie, youngest son of M. C. Trotter, of Trotter's Store, died Monday, May 15, at 3 p.m., after an illness of a week. His bowels being locked. Several eminent physicians were summoned and fond parents, devoted brothers and sympathizing friends did all in their power to alleviate his suffering and restore him to health, but without success. He was interred in the Union Grove Cemetery, Tuesday evening, services by E. M. Wynn.

Douglass -- Monday evening, May 15, the king of terrors invaded the home of J. E. Douglass, of Trotter's Store, and took from that pleasant home his daughter, Miss Martha, who was just blooming into womanhood. She had been afflicted with consumption for more than a year but was not considered dangerous at the time. A short time before her death she was engaged in conversation with her mother when she was seized with a hemorrhage and died in less than an hour.


May 24, 1899

Pickens -- J. A. Pickens, Sr., of Cusick, died Tuesday, May 16, at 7 p.m., at a ripe old age. Esq. Pickens was well known throughout Sevier County and was highly respected by all who knew him. For more than twenty years, he was a member of the county court. While a member of that body he always took a firm stand for what he believed to be right and there was never any question as to his standing on either men or measures. He was a firm loyal and devoted friend who could always be relied upon. He was an obliging neighbor who will be greatly missed in his community.

Branson -- Katie Branson, wife of J. A. Branson, of Pokeberry, died Tuesday morning, May 16th, after a lingering illness. She was a daughter of Aaron Gobble, of Jay Ell, and was a lady highly esteemed by all who knew her.

Hill -- Eliza Hill, an old and respected lady, died at the home of S. H. Lanning, of Millican, Friday night, May 19th.

Breeden -- J. A. Breeden, who was for several years in the photography business at this place, died at Rock Spring, Texas, Saturday, May 13th. Last fall he left here for the Lone Star state hoping to regain his failing health. A few weeks ago Mrs. Breeden and her little son left for that place to join him, but when they arrived at their destination they found that their husband and stepfather had died and been buried in a strange land. Mrs. Breeden had spent all her savings reaching Texas and found herself among stranger without money. She wrote to Dr. E. H. Pearce telling him of her condition. At once a subscription was started to raise money to pay for the return of her and her little son to Sevierville. Sunday night a public collection was taken for her benefit. A sufficient amount has been raised to defray their expenses from Rock Spring to Sevierville. Mrs. Breeden and her little son have our sympathy in their sad bereavement.

Trotter -- Anna, wife of A. S. Trotter of Pigeon Forge, died Monday morning and was buried in the Pigeon Forge Cemetery the following day. She was a daughter of the late Blackburn Jones. She was a faithful Christian, a devoted wife and indulgent mother, an obliging neighbor and a lady highly esteemed. She leaves a husband and five children who will keenly feel the loss of their dearest and best friend. Our heartfelt sympathy is extended to them.

Fogarty -- M. Fogarty, proprietor of the Shamrock saloon, died at his place of business Saturday morning. The Knoxville Sentinel says that his funeral was perhaps the most largely attended of any one in the history of Knoxville.



June 7, 1899

Henry -- Ed, a little seven year old son of Sam Henry of Trotter's Store, died Friday June 2nd at 2 p.m. He had been suffering from inflammatory rheumatism and was recently seized with typhoid fever.

Metler -- Mrs. S. M. Metler, of Knoxville, died Saturday, June 3rd at about 9 o'clock a.m., after a lingering illness. She was the mother of Frank Walker of this place. Mr. Walker and wife left soon after her death to attend the funeral.


June 28, 1899

Maples -- Florence, wife of P. Maples of this place, died at Henderson's Springs, Tuesday evening, June 20, about 3 o'clock. She had been an invalid for quite a while but her friends did not realize that the end was so near until the evening before her death. Through all her sickness, her husband watched over her tenderly, procuring the best medical aid that could be had and had just recently taken her to this celebrated summer resort in hope of reviving her declining system. She was a daughter of S. W. Cowden, of Kodak, and was born in August, 1872. She was married to Mr. Maples, June 13, '95, and with him she lived happily until the angel of death claimed her for its victim. She was interred in the Alder Branch cemetery the following day, funeral services by Rev. D. F. Manly. After a song and prayer by Rev. M. A. Rule, Brother Manly announced for his text the 10th verse of the XVI chapter of Mark: "And she went and told them that she had been with Him as they mourned and wept." He delivered an able and instructive discourse, setting for the the beauties of the sweet life beyond and offering words of comfort to those who are bereaved. He did not come to pay the last tribute of respect to the deceased but hoped the beautiful month of May would never pass without her grave being decorated with flowers. Speaking of our duty to bereaved ones he said it was our duty to visit homes laden with sorrow, but the only sure place for comfort was at a throne of mercy. At the close of his discourse the remains were viewed by the audience. Many eyes were filled with tears and the lamentations of the heart broken mother and other dear ones were pathetic indeed. The deceased was an estimable lady, a dutiful and loving wife, a fond an indulgent stepmother, adored by her husband and his children, and admired and respected by all who knew her.

Rawlings -- Sarah Rawlings was born June 12th, 1826. She professed religion at the age of 11 years and joined the Cumberland Presbyterian church at Big Spring Camp Ground in Jefferson county. She moved to Sevierville at the age of 15. When she came to Sevierville there being no Cumberland Presbyterian church here she attached herself to the M. E. Church, South, of which she lived a consistent member until her death, June 23, 1899, at 11:30 p.m. In 1843 she was married to Michael A. Rawlings, unto them were born seven children, five of whom survive her, also 29 grandchildren and 18 great-grand-children. Funeral services were conducted Sunday morning, at the M. E. Church, South, by Rev. W. W. Pyott, reading scripture lesson, song and prayer, and a discourse upon the life and character of the deceased. At 9:30 the funeral procession started for the Shiloh cemetery where the services were concluded.

Baker -- Katie, wife of Hugh B. Baker, of Walden, died Monday, June 26th, at 6 a.m., after an illness of a little over a week from paralysis and was buried in the Walden cemetery the following day, services by Rev. M. A. Rule. She was member of the M. E. Church, a loving and faithful wife, a kind and indulgent mother and an obliging neighbor. Her husband and children and grandchildren have our sympathy in their sad bereavement.

Shaw -- Maggie, wife of W. A. Shaw, of Eldee, died Friday evening, June 23d. After a lingering illness from consumption. She leaves a husband and one child.

Jones -- The wife of Will Jones, of Henry's X Roads, died Monday morning, June 25th.

Hodsden--An infant son of Jesse Hodsden, a colored laborer on the farm of I. C. McMahan, died Monday morning.

Proffitt -- Ann, wife of S. T. Proffitt, of Jones' Cove, died Sunday, June 25th after a lingering illness from consumption. She was buried the following day in the family cemetery near by with appropriate ceremonies. She leaves three small daughters who together with a husband and two step-daughters will keenly feel their loss. She was a daughter of the late G. C. Shrader. She was a model woman, admired and respected by all who knew her.


July 5, 1899

Trotter -- Anna Jane, the infant daughter of A. S. Trotter, of Pigeon Forge, died Wednesday, June 28th, and was laid to rest in the Pigeon Forge cemetery beside its mamma, who preceded it only a few weeks. Mr. Trotter and the surviving children have our sympathy in this additional bereavement, and we hope their hearts may be drawn closer to a throne of mercy and that in the sweet bye and bye they may all be reunited.

Newman -- Sinda Stella, little six and a half months old daughter of H. H. Newman, died Friday morning, June 30th, and was buried in the Millican cemetery in the afternoon services by Rev. W. W. Pyott. The little cherub had been a sufferer from her birth, bur she has now gone where suffering is unknown. Mr. and Mrs. Newman have our sympathy in this second bereavement which has overtaken them in so short a time.

Huff -- Jane, wife of A. J. Huff, of Walden, was taken quite suddenly and dangerous ill Sunday night and died before noon Monday. She was the only daughter of Hugh B. Baker. She was a consistent member of the M. E. Church, was a good wife and mother, and a lady highly esteemed. Her bereaved husband and children, and heart-broken father and brothers have our sympathy in this unexpected sadness.

DEATH OF THE OLDEST MAN IN SEVIER COUNTY Stalling -- John H. Stalling, of the 12th district, died Thursday evening, June 29th, at the age of 108. He was a good citizen, a consistent member of the Baptist church. He leaves four sons and a number of grandchildren. He was a native of North Carolina.

McClure -- While playing in childhood glee Monday evening, a little boy of George McClure of Wear's Valley with a match set fire to the clothes of his baby sister, burning off her clothes and burning the child so badly that she died that night. She was laid to rest in the Mattox burying ground Tuesday evening. Services by Rev. J. D. Lawson.

Miss Martha Charlotte Emert died at the residence of her mother, Mrs. Sarah Emert on Middle Creek, Thursday evening June 8th, 1899, at 4 o'clock p.m. age 22 years, 11 months and 15 days. For about two years Martha had been in very delicate health, but not until very recently had her afflictions reached such a stage as to alarm her friends. Martha was the pride of her father's household, and a favorite with all the relatives. Her bright intellect, her sweet, gentle disposition, her tender loving heart and the cordial greeting she always gave, won for her a large number of acquaintenances and warm friends. She could count her friends by the score, and always remembered and cherished them, and none knew her but to love her. As a church member at this place, which she has been for the past ten years, she was one of our best. Martha took a lively interest in the Sunday School and Epworth league work. Many, many hearts were saddened when the death was anounced by the slow tolling of the bell, and many tears will fall as the sad intelligence reaches her many friends and relatives which reside at a distance from her home. The bright Thursday of June 8th, 1899, will be recalled with sadness by the many friends and relatives who loved her so fondly. But our sadness should be mingled with joy when we remember that Martha, one of mortalities richest flowers, blooms now in all her celestial beauty, and is divinely fair. That on snowy pinions of redeeming love she basks in the sunlight of fruition, floating o'er flowery fields and along the crystal waters of the sweet haven of rest. When here on earth Martha gave her heart of God at 12 years of age, trusting Him in her childish faith. She joined the church at this place, and was ever a consistent member of the same. Her remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Middle Creek Cemetery June 9th, 1899, at 3 o'clock p.,m. Rev. M. A. Rule and E. M. Wynn conducted the ceremonies in the presence of a large crowd of relatives and friends, who had gathered to pay their respects to the memory of Martha. Martha died with God's praises on her lips, and in her dying hour she whispered, "All is well."


July 12, 1899

Henderson -- Orlena, the little five year old daughter of A. B. Henderson, of Knoxville, died at 1 o'clock Frisday morning, after a lingering illness. She was a bright sweet girl. Mr. Henderson and family have our sympathy in their sad bereavement.

Williams -- John Williams, of Henderson's Springs died Wednesday, July 5, at 11 a.m., and was buried in the Shiloh Cemetery the following day, services by Rev. C. Rule. He was the father of twelve children six of whom have preceded him to the spirit land. He was a member of the Baptist church and unassuming citizen.

Murphy -- Johnnie, the little two year old son of H. H. Murphy, of Walden died Thursday morning, July 6.

Webb -- An infant daughter of L.D. Webb, of Pigeon Forge died Thursday morning.


July 19, 1899

Maggie E. Shaw, wife of W. A. Shaw, departed this life June 23rd, 1899, age 30 years. She was a daughter of J. M. Layman of Eldee. Her mother died when she was eight years old, therefore she was raised without a mother. Her parents gave her to the Lord in childhood. When she grew up she accepted the Saviour and joined the M. E. Church at Cummings Chapel and lived a consistent member until taken from labor to rest. She was united in holy wedlock of W. A. Shaw, September 23, 1889, and to them was born one child who is 9 years of age, the age of Maggie when her mother was taken from her. Maggie ever remembers her vow to perform it as a wife and was always in her place and did her duty and did it well. As a mother, she neglected not her darling little child, Gracie, but was endeavoring to lead her in the right way. During her sickess she was a constant student of the Bible and endeavoring to lead her in the right way. [possibly mistranscribed] During her sickness, she was a constant student of the Bible and endeavoring to do its bidding losing sight of all earthly things. She said she was going to Heaven and wanted all to meet her there, and when the tempestuous night rolled away the morning sun was casting his golden rays over the little earthly home of our dear Maggie at 8 o'clock. The sanctified soul of dear Maggie took its flight to the land whose light is never dimmed by shadow; whose fields are ever vernal while nothing beautiful can fade but blooms for age eternal. Its shinging towers we may not see with our dim earthly vision; for death the silent warden keeps the key that opens these gates elysian. The funeral was conducted at Cumming's Chapel with a large number of friends and relatives. While we stood at the grave's mouth and bid farewell to our dear Maggie. Blessed be the name of the Lord, we didn't weep as those that had no hope, but with faith we look beyond the flight of time beyond this vale of death, where surely is a blessed clime where life is not a breath. "When the death devoted Greek, Ion, bid his beloved Clemanthe farewell, she said to him "Shall we meet again?" He answered, "I have asked the dreadful question of the hills around that look eternal; of the brooks that flow on forever and the starts among whose azure heights my raised spirit hath walked in glory, and all are dumb, but as I look upon your face and see the love that mantles throughout its beauty it tells me, yes, we will meet again. While I pen this sentiment the sound of our dear Maggie touches my soul and I feel like saying yes, we will meet you dear Maggie beyond the chilling waves of death's dark river where are no tear dimmed eye, no form by sickenss wasted, no sad farewell is heard, no lonely wail for loving ones departed. One precious to our hearts is gone; the voice we loved is stilled, the place made vacant in our home cannot be filled. Our father in his wisdom has called the one his love had given, and though on earth her body lies, her soul is safe in Heaven. P. M. Shaw

Early -- An infant children of W. W. Early died Monday, July 10th and was buried in the Murphy's Chapel cemetery Tuesday morning. Services by Rev. W.W. Pyott.

White -- Thomas White, an old and highly respected citizen of Henry's X Roads, died Monday July 10 and was buried the following afternoon, services by Rev. W. W. Pyott. He was a member of the M. E. Church, south.

Green -- An infant girl of John R. Green, of Middle Creek, died Sunday evening July 16th, aged one week. Services were conducted at the residence Monday morning by J. F. Stott and at the cemetery by Rev. J. A. Baker.

Whaley -- Jack the little twelve year old of P. H. Whaley of Knoxville, died Saturday morning July 15 after a brief illness and was brought back to Greenbrier where he was interred Sunday.

Trundle -- Mrs. Amanda Trundle, one of the oldest and most highly respected ladies of Boyd's Creek, died Saturday afternoon, July 15th at the home of her son, W. S. Trundle. She was buried in the family burying ground Sunday morning. Services by Rev. W. W. Pyott.

Compton -- Betsy Compton, of Walden, died Monday July 17th and was buried in the Shiloh Cemetery the following day.

Keeble -- Mattie, wife of Caleb Keeble, of Black Oak, died Monday July 17th and was interred in the Shiloh Cemetery Tuesday morning.



August 2, 1899

Line -- A fifteen months old child of W. M. Line of Boyd's Creek died Thursday, July ?

Carter -- Madison L. Carter of Walden, died at his home at 1:30 a.m. Saturday, July 29th. He was interred in the Walden's Creek cemetery in the afternoon. He leaves two sons and two daughters. His wife died only a few months ago.

Terry -- Mrs. Terry, an old and highly respected lady of Republican died July 25th after a lingering illness.

Dixon -- Miss Hattie, the oldest daughter of Wm. Dixon, of Harrisburg, died Monday night, July 31st, at 11:30. Miss Hattie was a noble young lady, loved and respected by all who knew her. She will be interred in the Redbank cemetery this morning. Funeral services by Revs. M. A. Rule and W. W. Pyott.

Fox -- Mrs. Rebeca Fox of Walden, died soon after noon Monday, and was buried in the cemetery nearby the following day. She was a little over 63 years of age, a member of the M. E. Church, and a lady highly esteemed and respected by all who knew her. She leaves five sons and one daughter, all of whom are grown.

Houk -- John Houk, of Eldee died? last Thursday, July 27th after a lingering illness.

Coleman -- Katie, wife of J. W. Coleman, died at 4 a.m., Thursday morning, July 27th, and was buried the following day.


August 23, 1899

Rector -- Mary Jane Rector who died at noon Tuesday Aug. 15, 1899 was about 63 years of age and was a native of North Carolina. In the prime of her young womanhood she married Geo. Clark with whom she lived happily until his death which occurred about 30 years ago. Unto them were born two sons and a daughter, Baxter, Joe and Ellen Clark. About twenty years ago she married M. C. Rector with whom she lived happily until her death. Unto them was born four children, three daughters who survive and a son who died in infancy. She was a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and had been for 25 years. She bore her afflictions with a christian patience and forebearance that was an inspiration to all who saw her, ever expressing a resignation to the will of Him Who doeth all things well a readiness to die if it was His will. She was laid to rest in the McCarter cemetery Wednesday August 16, services by Rev. M. W. McCarter. Her aged husband and her loving children have our sympathy in this dark hour of sad bereavement. May husband and children so live that the family may at last be reunited.


September 6, 1899

Lindsey -- Joel Lindsey aged about 64 years, after a lingering illness with Typhoid fever, departed this life Aug. 25, 1899, on the following day funeral services were held at Evan's Chapel by Revs. G. B. Whaley and Wm. Seay. A vast crowd turned out to pay the last sad tribute of respect to him showing the esteem in which he was held by all. He leaves no son or daughter yet we all delight to call him Uncle Joel. Our loved one has passed from us. But there is relief. We remember with joy his faith in the son of God. He was no sectarian. He religion was as broad as the religion of Christ. He was a simple Christian, and wholly in fellowship with all pure spirits. He loved to talk of rest, now he has it. The patient soul which groaned under the burden of the suffering flesh is now in a world without pain.

Stuart -- Mrs. G. Mc. Stuart of Parrottsville died Sunday morning, Sept. 3, after an illness of about one month. She was considered better but took suddenly ill Saturday night and died next morning. She was the mother of Mrs. J. R. Penland of this place. Mrs. Penland was almost prostrated over the sad news, this being the first death in their family. Upon hearing the news Mr. Penland and family left at once for the Stuart home to attend the funeral. The many friends of Mrs. Penland and her estimable family in this county deeply sympathize with her in this sudden and sad bereavement.

Floyd -- Leona, wife of Robert Floyd, Jr., of Middle Creek, died Sunday, August 20 after a lingering illness and was buried in the Middle Creek Cemetery the following day, services by J. F. Stott.

Monroe -- Norma Belle Monroe, a little girl fourteen days less than twelve months of age who has made her home with Mrs. W. H. Bowers died Friday morning Sept. 1 and interred in the Middle Creek Cemetery by the side of its mother who was placed there in January.


September 20, 1899

Christopher -- Laura, the little eleven month old girl of John Christopher died at their residence on New Street Monday morning. Funeral services at 1 p.m. by Rev. W. W. Pyott, after which the remains were taken to Alder Branch Cemetery for interment.

Newton -- An infant son of W. T. Newton of Knoxville died last week at the age of eleven weeks.

Blalock -- a five weeks old child of S. A. Blalock of Jayell died Sept. 7.


September 27, 1899

Archer -- Elizabeth, wife of J. L. Archer, of Republican, died Thursday Sept. 21. She was a daughter of the late Absalom Allen and a member of the Baptist church at Jones' Chapel. She was born April 10, 1837. May 7, 1859 she was married to Mr. Archer, with whom she lived happily until her death. She was laid to rest in the family cemetery, services by Rev. John Russell.


October 18, 1899

Hooper -- Dr. L. W. Hooper of Newport died quite suddenly at 2:15 a.m. Saturday Oct. 7. He was an eminent physician and a useful citizen. His wife and son have our sympathy in this sad bereavement.

Gass -- Frank Gass, little son of Wade Gass, died Tuesday night Oct. 10 at 9 o'clock and was interred in the Shiloh Cemetery Thursday morning services by Rev. W. W. Pyott.

Rogers -- Jennie Rogers of Cusick died Friday night Oct. 6. She was the only daughter of the late J. A. Pickens and was a highly accomplished and very popular lady.

McCarter. A little child of Mitchell McCarter of Catlettsburg, died Wednesday night Oct. 11.

Agee. Dr. J. H. Agee, a prominent and influential citizen of Campbell county, died Sunday, Oct. 8th, in his 73d year.


November 1, 1899

Pearl Thurman, who was wounded in the melee Oct. 13th, died at 2 a.m., Thursday, Oct. 26th, and was buried in the Eden cemetery the following day. The spacious church was filled to overflowing with sympathizing friends of the family. Rev. M. A. Rule read a scripture lesson from the 15th chapter of 1st Corinthians and offered a fervent prayer, asking that this sad scene redown to the good of the community. Rev. W. W. Pyott in his preliminary remarks state that his responsibility was to the living, and that every obligation to the young man now dead had been met, and he stood before his audience with a consciousness of duty performed. He looked back with sorrow on the past two awful weeks and if there was a single obligation to Pearl Thurman neglected, he failed to recall it. He was at his side within five minutes after he was shot, procuring for him a comfort and a pillow while he lay upon the ground, assisted to remove him to the Masonic building, helped wash the blood from his wounds and assisted in removing him to the hotel, where he could have a good room and attention. For eight nights he watched at his bedside without undressing. He said he did not say this in a boasting spirit, he had done nothing more than his duty. He took for his text the ninth verse of the one hundred and nineteenth Psalm: "Wherewithal shall a young man cleanse his way? By taking heed thereto according to Thy Word." He spoke at length in an eloquent and impressive vein upon the evil of disobeying the laws of our parents, the laws of our country and the laws of God. He said often a young man decides that he must have his own way regardless of the wishes of his parents. Even wicked parents, generally given their children good advice. Asking Pleas Wynn just before he went upon the scaffold if he had any message to the people? He received the answer: "Tell the boys to be obedient to their parents." Could Pearl Thurman speak to this audience, he would not tell you that he had obeyed the instructions of his christian mother and his upright father. The young man who is in the habit of getting drunk, can only cleanse his way by touching not, tasting not, handling not the unclean thing. He spoke feelingly of the terror of evil habits, then turning his thoughts to the goodness of God, he pointed out the way of escape. He closed with a recount of his experience with the deceased since he received the fatal wounds and firmly believed that he had sought and found peace with a merciful God. The beautiful casket was covered with lovely flowers brought by loving friends. P. T. Haggard, who had been with him a great deal during his sickness and who furnished the casket, superintended the funeral. The remains were viewed by the throng. It was a sad funeral and should teach all young men to keep clear of bad company.



March 21, 1900

DeLozier -- Mrs. Clarinda DeLozier, of Zollar, died at the home of her son Joseph DeLozier, Thursday morning, March 15th at the advanced age of 76. She was a modest sympathetic christian lady beloved by all who knew her. She was the mother of Asa DeLozier of Gist's Creek, and George L. DeLozier, of Boyd's Creek, who was twice elected sheriff of Sevier county. She was buried in the Ellejoy Cemetery the following day.

Ellis -- Dr. J. C. Ellis, of Trundle's X Roads, died at his home Thursday, March 15th, at 10:30 p.m., after a week's painful suffering from apoplexy. Dr. Ellis was a prominent physician and politician as well. Funeral services were conducted at the residence the following day.

Thurman -- Elizabeth, wife of J. A. Thurman, died Thursday morning March 15th. She had been unwell for some days but was not regarded as dangerous and her death came as a shock to her family and friends. She was a daughter of Rev. John Russell, and was born Jan. 22d, 1841. In early womanhood she married Wm. Allen, who volunteered on the Union side in the Civil War and died while in service. Unto them was born one son, W. C. Allen, our present Trustee. Later she married J. A. Thurman, unto them were born six children, five of whom survive her. She was interred in the family burying ground Friday. Funeral services by Rev. E. A. Holbert. She was a Christian lady, a devoted wife and indulgent mother. Her aged father, devoted husband and loving children have our sympathy in this sad bereavement.

Woody -- A boy was born to Frank Woody and wife Saturday morning. It appeared stout and healthy, but at four o'clock in the afternoon it died. It was buried in the Walnut Grove Cemetery, Sunday afternoon.


May 23, 1900

Hammer -- Lou, wife of M. M. Hammer, of Catlettsburg, died Thursday night, May 17th, at 11:45. Monday morning she was delivered of a girl babe and apparently did well until Monday night when she was taken with convulsions and never spoke again. She was a daughter of J. D. Davis, and was born May 3d, 1867. In early life, she professed religion and joined the Baptist Church, at Alder Branch, of which society she lived an honored and consecrated member until death. February 2d, 1897, she was married to her husband with whom she lived happily until her death. She was buried in the Trundle Cemetery, Friday evening, services by Rev. W. W. Pyott. A large crowd of sorrowing relatives and sympathyzing friends attended the funeral, and her grave was litterly covered with flowers, the tribute of kind and loving friends. Her heart broken husband, her tender babe, her aged father, her brothers and sisters have the sympathy of the entire community.

Sutton -- Betsey, wife of R. L. Sutton, of Walden, died Tuesday night, May 15th, at 10:00 o'clock. She had been unwell for a few days, but was not considered dangerous. Her husband ? Juror from his district and ????? the night with Rufus French, a former neighbor and could not be found. When the family came in from doing the chores Tuesday afternoon, Mrs. Sutton was not to be found about the house, and searching for her was found out near the creek, dangerously ill and speechless. She was taken to the house and restoratives applied, but she gradually grew worse and died. She was near sixty years of age and was an estimable lady.

Tarwater -- A son of J. R. Tarwater, of New Knob Creek, died Tuesday, May 15th.

Nolen -- Polly, wife of Reed Nolen, of Emert's cove, died Tuesday evening, about sundown from fever. Amada, wife of Mark Nolen of Emert's cove, died this morning at 4 o'clock from fever. The Nolen boys are sons of Peter Nolen, and there in the same house lie their companions cold in death.

May 30, 1900

Williams -- James Williams, of Rainbow, died at his home Wednesday evening, May 23d, after a lingering illness. He was a member of the Baptist Church, and was a hightoned gentleman and a good citizen. He leaves a widow, five sons and one daughter, who will keenly feel the loss of a devoted husband and indulgent father. He was interred in a burying place on his own farm selected by himself Friday morning. Services by Rev. W. Thomas and G. W. Williams.


June 6, 1900

Mrs. Hattie A. Atchley, wife of A. C. Atchley, was born May 5th, 1863, and died April 13th, 1900. She was early brought to Christ by her Christian parents. Confessing Christ as her Savior at the early age of 13 years and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which she was a faithful member till her death. September 9th, 188?, she was happily united in marriage to A. C. Atchley, and eight bright, beautiful children were born unto them, three of whom are professed christians, following in the footsteps of their loving, faithful mother. She was a dutiful child, a most devoted mother, a true conscientious friend, and above all a genuine, consistent Christian She lived her Christian profession in her home, every where and every day. She was the embodiment of unselfishness, never thinking of self, but always thinking of the need and happiness of other's burdens, and so fulfilling the law of love. She lived not for herself but, for others, her husband, her children, her friends, her Master and its Kingdom. It was the writers privilege to know her intimately, to enjoy her unfeigned friendship and love, to visit her home and partake of her kind, generous hospitality. She was so honest and sunny that her presence was always a benediction. When you stood in her presence you felt ???? Of one whose life reflected the light of Heaven, whose face shown with the peace and joy of Heaven, whose life was elevating and ennobling, one who was like her mother in life, character and spirit. It can be truthfully said that her life made other lives brighter, sweeter, better, nobler. Oh, blessed memory! "The righteous shall be held in everlasting remembrance." Hattie is enshrined in the memory of all who knew her, and although she is no longer with us in body, she will never be forgotten. Her memory will always be precious and sacred. Hattie has entered into the immediate presence of God, where there are pleasures for-ever-more. Death to her seems simply the opening of the gate into the eternal city, the opening of the door into the mansions prepared for God's children. While we mourn her loss, while we suffer intensely in mind, she is perfectly happy, because perfectly free from all that mars one's happiness and because she enjoys perfect, uninterrupted fellowship with God, Christ, Angels and all the redeemed gone before. Out loss if her eternal gain. She is "over there" waiting and watching for us. If we are faithful to our Master and Lord, Hattie will be one of the redeemed hosts of Heaven who will welcome us into the home of eternal day and happiness. There will be no dark valley when Jesus comes. There will be no dark valley when Jesus comes. There will be no dark valley when Jesus comes. There'll be no more sorrow when Jesus comes. There'll be no more sorrow when Jesus comes, But a precious morrow when Jesus comes. There'll be no more weaping when Jesus comes. There'll be no more weaping when Jesus comes, But a blessed reaping when Jesus comes. There'll be songs of greeting when Jesus comes. There'll be songs of greeting when Jesus comes, And a joyful meeting when Jesus comes. To gather his loved ones home. To gather his loved ones home. To gather his loved ones home, There'll be no dark valley when Jesus comes, To gather his loved ones home.


June 13, 1900

It pleased God to remove from our midst Sister Susan M. C. Atchley, who died April the 27, 1900. She was the fifth daughter of John Watson, and wife of Elder Robert Atchley, who passed her in the lane of life several years ago, to reap a good reward we hope. Sister Atchley was born in North Carolina, April 7, 18? And was married to Rev. Robert Atchley, September 5, 1870. She ? the Baptist church within very young and lived a worthy member until the Lord called her ? way from the toils and sufferings of this life to enter into that sweet rest in heaven we hope. She leaves four children, three daughters and one son to mourn their loss.


[Newspaper date not transcribed]

Widener -- Miss Nora, daughter of Wm. Widener of Boyd's Creek, died Sunday morning June 17, after a brief illness from consumption. She was near seventeen years of age and was deservedly popular.

Ferguson -- A babe was born to J. C. Ferguson and wife of Jay Ell Sunday morning June 17, and died about two hours after its birth.

Benson -- Wm. Benson of Pigeon Forge died Sunday, June 17, after a lingering illness. He was an orderly in the Second Tennessee Cavalry in the Civil War. He filled the position of justice of the peace. He was a carpenter by trade and a member of the Primitive Baptist Church.

Bettis -- Ellen, wife of J. L. Bettis died Saturday, June 16, after a lingering illness from consumption. She was a daughter of S. A. Sims, Esq. In early life she professed religion and joined the Baptist church and lived a consistent member until death. She was an obedient daughter, a devoted wife, and indulgent mother and a lady loved and esteemed by all who knew her. The bereaved husband and three children have the sympathy of the entire community in this sad bereavement.

Hatcher -- Sam V. Hatcher of Wears Valley died Sunday, June 17, after a lingering illness from catarrh of the head and consumption. He was interred in the family burying ground Monday, services by Rev. J. D. Lawson.



July 4, 1900

Reagan -- L. A. Reagan, of Sugarville, who had been halting between life and death for some time, expired Friday June 22, the day after he returned from Knoxville, whither he had gone for medical treatment. He was buried in the cemetery near the old Reagan homestead the following day. Services by Rev. E. W. Ogle.

McMahan -- Dicie, relict of the late John McMahan, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. W. B. Bryan, three miles west of Sevierville, Thursday morning June 28th at 5 o'clock and was buried in the Shiloh Cemetery in the afternoon.

Wallace -- Mrs. Ella Wallace, wife of W. W. Wallace, died June 27th. She was the daughter of Wash Henderson. Her mother was a daughter of Maj. James Catlett. Mrs. Wallace was a member of the southern Methodist Church. She died in the faith, and was buried in at Henry's X Roads, near her home. In the absence of the pastor, Rev. W. W. Pyott, Rev. M. A. Rule kindly officiated at burial. In this sad affliction the family have the sympathy of many friends.

Duggan -- R. C. Duggan, formerly of this county, but who moved to Texas about seven years ago, died at his home near McKinney, Sunday, June 17. He was about 40? years old and leaves five children. His oldest son, Will L. Duggan, is constable of the 3rd district and four younger children accompanied him west. He was a brother to Pl__ Duggan, Esq., of Walden, and Hon. W. L. Duggan and Mrs. J. A. Thomas, of East Fork. He was sick three or four weeks.

Stott -- Jane, wife of A. F. Stott, of Middle Creek, died soon after three o'clock yesterday morning after a brief illness from fever and heart trouble. She was a daughter of J. H. Buter of Middle Creek and was an amiable Christian lady.


July 11, 1900

Stott -- Elizabeth Jane, wife of A. F. Stott, was buried at Middle Creek, Wednesday, July 4th. A vast crowd of sorrowing relatives and sympathizing friends turned out to pay her the last tribute of respect. Services were conducted by Rev. A. B. McKenzie who spoke briefly of the life and character of the deceased and exhorted those present to so live that they would meet her in Heaven. She was born Sept. 18, 1869. Professing religion at the age of eleven, she joined the Methodist Episcopal Church and lived a faithful and consistent member of the same until her death. December 18, 1898, she was united in marriage to A. F. Stott. This happy union was short but pleasant. Tuesday morning, July 3d, the Good Shepherd said it is enough come up higher. Her bereaved husband, her tender babe, her brothers, sisters parents and grand parents have the sympathy of the entire community.

Covington -- Narcissus Covington, of Boyd's Creek, died Thursday, July 5th, 1900, at the advanced age of 87 years. She was buried the following day, services by Rev. W. W. Pyott.

Hammer -- Mary Elizabeth, infant daughter of M. M. Hammer of Catlettsburg, died Tuesday, Jane 26th, 1900.

Widener -- An infant son of Harrison Widener of Boyd's Creek, died Monday, July 2d, 1900.


July 25, 1900

Rauhuff -- Sarah, wife of W. H. Rauhuff, of Pigeon Forge, died Wednesday morning, July 18th, 1900, after an illness of six weeks from fever. She was the daughter of our townsman B. M. Atchley. She was a member of the Baptist church and an exemplary lady. She leaves a husband and six children, who will keenly feel the loss of a devoted wife and an indulgent mother. She was laid to rest in the Shiloh Cemetery, Thursday morning. Services by Rev. Mark Roberts.

Butler -- R. A. Butler, or Middle Creek, who had been making a strong fight for life for two weeks yielded to the inevitable Thursday evening, July 19th, 1900. He was a young man of bright promise and was the idol of fond parents and loving brothers and sisters, and the ideal of many admiring friends. He was an apt scholar from his earliest days, an long before he was sufficiently advanced in years to take charge of a public school, he had successfully passed the teacher's examination. When he arrived at the proper age he began teaching, and at once took high rank as a teacher of ability and character. He was a Christian gentleman and was admired and respected by all who knew him His funeral at the Middle Creek Cemetery, Friday afternoon, was one of the most largely attended at that historic burying ground. Services were conducted by Revs. E. M. Wynn, J. D. Lawson, and A. B. McKenzie. His death is universally lamented, and the bereaved family have the sympathy of his entire acquaintance.


August 1, 1900

Rolen -- The people of this county learned with regret Saturday morning that Mrs. Anna Rolen, of Jones Cove had passed away. She was about ninety-three years of age. She was a member of one of the oldest and largest families of Sevier county all of who preceded her to the spirit land. In her young womanhood she was married to Joab Rolen with whom she lived happily until his death in April 1895. Unto them were born twelve children, only five of whom survive her. By industry and economy she and her husband amassed a snug little fortune. She was always kind to the poor and no deserving charity was ever turned away from her door empty handed. She was buried in the Proffitt Cemetery Sunday morning, services by Rev. W. T. Townsend.

Snapp -- Marusa, wife of J. M. Snapp, of Harrisburg, died Saturday morning about 10 o'clock a.m., at the residence of her mother, Mrs. N. J. Houk, a mile below town. She had been suffering from some time from a cancer but she born her sufferings with wonderful patience. She was interred in the Cemetery near Murphy's Chapel Sunday morning, services by Rev. W. W. Pyott.

Haggard -- Rev. N. H. Haggard, one of the oldest Ministers of Sevier county died at his home near New Knob Creek, Tuesday, July 24, after a lingering illness. He was buried in the Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Wednesday, with Masonic honors, a large crowd attending.

McNelly -- Lizzie, wife of Will McNelly, of Uceba, died at three o'clock Saturday afternoon, July 21 after a lingering illness. She was the oldest sister of Dr. J. B. DeLozier, of Fair Garden and was a devoted Christian lady, a loving wife and mother and was loved and esteemed by all who knew her. The family physician, the family and loving friends did all in their power to alleviate her suffering and restore her to health but to no avail, the Master said it is enough, come up higher.

Mrs. Foster, wife of James Foster, who has been sick quite a while of dropsy, died Thursday, and was interred the following day in Knob Creek Cemetery. She leaves behind a husband and friends who feel that they have sustained a great loss in her death.


August 15, 1900

Atchley -- Flora, wife of A. C. Atchley died Tuesday Aug. 8, after a lingering illness. She was born Oct. 11, 1875, and was married to A. C. Atchley March 1, 1891, but Rev. C. L. Boling. The union was blest with four children three boys and one girl. She was interred in the Alder Branch Cemetery Wednesday afternoon, services by Rev. D. F. Manley.

-- Saturday morning there was born unto Joe McCown and wife a girl babe. It was dead born.


August 22, 1900

Ingalls -- Former United States Senator John J. Ingalls, of Kansas, died Thursday August 16, at Las Vegas, New Mexico.

Franklin -- James, five year old son of Will Franklin of Wear's Valley, died Wednesday, August 15, after an illness of six weeks from Typhoid Fever.


August 22, 1900

Atchley -- Miss Nan Atchley died at 5:20 a.m. Wednesday, August 15, from a violent attack of typhoid fever. Her family physician, affectionate father, a noble step-mother loving sisters, devoted brothers and sympathizing friends did all they could to alleviate her suffering and with a hope that she would survive the attack until the last. Tuesday morning she appeared better and strong hopes were entertained of her recovery, but early in the day she took a turn for the worse and grew weaker until the end. She was born Nov. 16, 1858. At an early age she professed religion and joined the Baptist church of which she lived a consistent member until her death. She was the youngest daughter of B. M. Atchley and took an active interest in his business and was the strong arm on which he had expected to lean as he journeyed down the western slope of life's rulled [?] plain. She was interred in the Alder Branch Cemetery in the afternoon. Services by Rev. D. F. Manly, who spoke briefly and feelingly upon the life and character of the deceased and of the importance of being ready for death.



October 3, 1900

Catlett -- Mrs. Dollie Ann Catlett, of Melee, relict of the late Rev. James E. Catlett, died Thursday, Sept. 20th, 1900, at 6 o'clock p.m., after a lingering illness, have not walked a step in over two years. She was abut 70 years of age. She was a member of the Baptist Church at Providence, and was a lady highly esteemed by all who knew her. She was interred in the Providence Cemetery Friday afternoon, services by Rev. N. B. Brock.


October 17, 1900

Henry -- Alfred Henry, of Jones' Cove, an old and highly respected citizen died Thursday afternoon Oct. 11.

Caton -- Mary, wife of H. B. Caton, died Thursday afternoon Oct. 11, after a lingering illness from consumption. She was a devoted and loving wife, a kind and indulgent mother and obliging neighbor and a consecrated Christian lady She leaves a a husband and five children who sadly mourn the loss of their dearest and best friend. She was interred in the Caton Cemetery Friday afternoon services by Rev. S. F. Paine.


October 24, 1900

Wilson -- William L. Wilson, author of the Wilson Tariff bill, died at Lexington, Va, quite suddenly Wednesday Oct. 17th.

Benson -- Nancy Jane, wife of B. F. Benson of the fifteenth district, died Saturday morning Oct. 20 at 3 o'clock, after a lingering illness from fever. She was interred in the Millican Grove Cemetery Sunday morning, services by Rev. Sam C. Atchley. Mr. Benson, together with several of his children are on the sick list.

Maples -- G. R. Maples, Sr., of Harrisburg, died Monday Oct. 22, at 7 p.m. He has been an invalid for several years, but through all these years he bore his afflictions with a Christian patience and forbearance that has never been surpassed. He was a soldier in the Civil War where he contracted the disease which finally produced his death. He was an exemplary citizen, a Christian gentleman, an affectionate and devoted husband, a kind and indulgent father. The funeral will be held today.


October 31, 1900

Sherman -- John Sherman, the ???? remarkable character on the stage of American politics died at his Washington residence, Monday, October 22.

Murphy -- Mrs. Ollie Murphy, of the ?? District, died Saturday morning, October 27th, at 3 o'clock after a lingering illness from consumption.

Hardin -- Hugh, the babe of Willie and Lillie Hardin, died Sunday morning, Oct. 28, quite suddenly, suffering from membranous croup and pneumonia. He was five months and 22 days old.

Allen -- Wesley Allen, colored (known as Tot) died Sunday, October 28, about noon, from fever.

Kear -- Mell, infant son of Joel and Fannie Kear, of Henderson's Springs, died Sunday afternoon, Oct. 28.


November 7, 1900

Duggan -- Joseph Duggan, of Banner, died Wednesday night Oct. 31. He had had a severe case of fever but was considered convalescent and have been discharged by his physician. A relapse is supposed to have been brought on by eating too much. He leaves a wife and three small children.

Thomas -- Mrs. Lititie Thomas, wife of Henry Thomas, of Millican, died Friday Nov. 2, after a brief illness from fever. Mr. Thomas is prostrated and not expected to survive.


November 14, 1900

Runyan -- A. A. Runyan, one of Sevier county's noblest citizens, died at 7 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 8. He had been ill for a few weeks and death was expected by all who knew of his affliction, but many did not know of his sickness until apprised of his death. He was born Nov. 24, 1822 and had he lived sixteen days longer he would have been seventy-eight years old. November 17th, 1852, he was married to Abigail J. McMahan, with whom he lived happily until his death. Unto them were born ten children, five of whom survive him, three of them died in childhood and two after they were grown and married. In young manhood he professed religion, and joined the Baptist church and lived a Christian life until his death. He was an exemplary citizen, honest in all his dealings, obliging to all his neighbors, accommodating and indulgent to the poor, kind, affectionate and devoted to his family, loved and respected by all who knew him. Without solicitation on his part he was chosen to fill several public positions, and he always tried to do his duty. He was interred in the Shiloh cemetery, Friday afternoon, funeral services by Rev. W. W. Pyott. His loving companion and devoted children, have our sympathy in this sad hour and may they all so live that they may meet him in the better land.

Thomas -- Henry Thomas, of Millican, died Wednesday night, Nov. 7. He had had the fever, but was considered convalescent, but Mrs. Thomas, who was also suffering from fever died. The loss of his companion and anxiety for his sons who are in the army, brought on nervous prostration, from which he never rallied.


November 21, 1900

Ogle -- Aaron Ogle, of Sugarville, died Wednesday, October 31, from chronic diseases, which have haunted him ever since his return from the civil war.


December 5, 1900

Campbell -- Mrs. Elizabeth Campbell, of Jones cove, died Thursday night Nov. 22, 1900 at the advanced age of 78. She was buried in the Henry Cemetery Saturday.

McMahan -- A small boy of Wash McMahan (colored) died Monday November 26.

Romines -- A seventeen year old son of Abel Romines died Monday, November 26.

Sarrett -- Frances Sarrett, of Catlettsburg, died Thursday evening, November 29th at 7 p.m., at the advanced ago of eighty-nine years, having been born Feb. 14, 1812. She was interred in the Alder Branch Cemetery, Friday afternoon, services by Rev. L. Cunningham.

Smith -- Rebecca, wife of George Smith living two miles south-east of Sevierville, died Saturday night December 1, about 11 o'clock after a lingering illness. She leaves a husband and four small children. She was interred Sunday afternoon, services by E. M. Wynn.

Brown -- Elijah Brown, one of our oldest and most highly respected citizens dies at his home of New Street Tuesday, December 4, shortly after ten a.m. He had been quite ill and death was expected. He leaves an affectionate wife and two loving daughters who have watched over him devotedly in his affliction. He was a christian gentleman and the world is better that he lived in it.


December 19, 1900

Trotter -- A fifteen pound boy was born at Esq. and Mrs. N. E. Trotter Tuesday morning, Dec. 11th. It was dead born.

Benson -- Jane Benson, of Wear's Valley, died Thursday night, Dec. 13th, after a lingering illness from consumption. She was a daughter of John Benson and was about 23 ? years of age.

Mitchell -- Dandridge, Dec. 13 -- Honr. J. Mitchell, one of the most prominent citizens of Jefferson County died here today, aged 87. He was a man of considerable wealth which he had accumulated by great industry and frugality. He had never been a politician, but represented Jefferson county in the lower house of the general assembly, about ten years ago. He was a Mason and a member of the Methodist Church. The funeral was held on Friday at 2 p.m. with Masonic honors.

Chance -- Mrs. Margaret Chance, of Middle Creek, died Wednesday night Dec. 12th, after a brief from la grippe and pneumonia. She was interred in the Middle Creek Cemetery Friday morning, services by Rev. A. B. McKenzie and W. M. Wynn. She was born Oct. 24th, 1829, and was at the time of her death past ? years of age. In childhoods tender years she professed religion and joined the M. E. Church of which she lived a consecrated member until death. She married Anderson Chance, with whom she lived happily until the breaking out of the Civil War, when he left home never to return. He joined the federal army, and died while in the service. Unto them were born five children, three of whom are dead. Two daughter Mrs. John Ogle, of Middle Creek, and Mrs. J. F. Stott, of Pigeon Forge, survive. Mrs. Chance was a model woman. Left a widow, she struggled hard to raise her children and give them a prominent place in society. She was a kind and obliging neighbor, even ministering to the wants of the sick and those in distress. Her place in the homes of her daughters, in the church and in the community will be greatly missed.



January 2, 1901

HALE. When the family of Guy Hale, of Black Oak, arose Saturday morning they found that Joseph Hale, Guy's father had died during the night. Mr. Hale was near sixty five years of age.

LOVEDAY. Lavina, wife of Robert Loveday, of Harrisburg, died Sunday Dec. 30, at 11 a.m. after a lingering illness. She was past sixty-six years of age and leaves a husband and five children. She was interred in the Conatser Cemetery Monday afternoon services by Rev. E. Hurst.


January 23, 1901

McMAHAN. Allen McMahan, of Jones' Cove, died Friday morning, Jan. 18th, 1901, at 2 o'clock, after a brief illness from pneumonia. He was a son of Lieutenant Sanders McMahan, and was an honest and industrious gentleman. He leaves a wife and several children who will keenly feel the loss of a devoted husband and indulgent father.


February 6, 1901

Deaths:

WYNN. The little daughter of J. W. Wynn and wife died Monday night, Jan 29th, 1901, at 10 o'clock, after an illness of only a few hours.

BISHOP. Polly Bishop, an inmate of this county poor house, died Sunday night, Jan. 28th. She was about 110 years old, and had been in feeble health quite a while.

ETHERTON. An infant son of Charlie Etherton and wife, of Republican, died Friday night Feb. 1.

TERRY. Lila, wife of Callie Terry, of Republican, died Sunday night after an illness of only a few days.

COKER. An infant child of Richard Coker and wife, of Jay Ell, died Monday night Feb. 4.

HENDERSON. Nancy, relict of R. B. Henderson, of Henderson's Springs, died Tuesday morning Feb. 5, at the advanced age of 86. She was a highly respected lady, a member of the Baptist Church and the mother of a large and prominent family. She will be interred today in the Shiloh Cemetery, services by Rev. H. B. Clapp.


February 20, 1901

LOVEDAY. Ida Loveday, of Harrisburg, died Thursday, Feb 14th, 1901, at the age of 16 years, after a brief illness from fever. She was buried in the Walnut Grove Cemetery Friday evening. Almost the entire family have been afflicted recently and several members are still quite unwell.

SHULTS. M. B. Shults, of Pigeon Forge, died Sunday, Feb. 17th, 1902, at 4 a.m. He had been in feeble health for years, but was not considered dangerous. He was taken Saturday night between ten and eleven with a severe pain over the eye and gradually grew worse until the end came. Mr. Shults was near sixty-seven or eight years of age, was a quiet, peaceable citizen and had raised a large family. He was laid to rest in the Pigeon Forge Cemetery Sunday afternoon. Services by Rev. A. B. McKenzie.

MOORE. William Moore, of Ridgeway, Friday afternoon was placing a shot gun with which he had been hunting, under the bed breech foremost, when the hammer struck a box, discharging the gun. The entire load took effect in his groin, ranging upward, cutting an artery and tearing the intestines. When asked by his mamma if he was hurt? He replied no, but he died in less than thirty minutes. He was in his fourteenth year and was a bright and popular boy. He professed religion at the recent meeting at that place conducted by Revs. Pyott and Davis. He was buried in the new Ridgeway Cemetery Saturday morning, services by Rev. W. W. Pyott. His parents are Sevier county people, and have many friends here who deeply sympathize with them in their sore affliction.


March 6, 1901

McCALEB. Mrs. Eliza McCaleb, of Rockwood, died Wednesday morning, Feb. 27th, 1901, at the age of 85. She was an aunt of Rev. W. W. Pyott. Mr. Pyott attended the funeral, returning home Monday.

ATCHLEY. Rev. Wm. Atchley, of Catlettsburg, died Sunday, March 3d, 1901, at 2 a.m. at the advanced age of 87 years and 10 months. He was a brother of our townsman, B. M. Atchley, and the father of W. D. Atchley, Esq. He was interred in the Alder Branch Cemetery Monday, services by Rev. D. F. Manly.


March 13, 1901

McCROSKEY. Mark McCroskey, of Catlettsburg, died Friday morning March 8, after a lingering illness from consumption and was buried in the Alder Branch Cemetery Saturday morning, services by Rev. W. W. Pyott. He was a member of the Baptist Church and was respected as a Christian gentleman.

DIXON. Wm. Dixon, of Harrisburg, died Wednesday March 6th after a brief illness of consumption. He was buried in the Cemetery at Murphy's Chapel Thursday morning, services were conducted at the residence by Rev. W. W. Pyott and at the grave by Rev. A. B. McKenzie. Mr. Dixon was a devoted husband, an indulgent father and obliging neighbor. He was a consistent member of the M. E. Church. Starting in life a poor boy, by industry and economy he succeeded in a amassing a competency for his family. The bereaved widow and children have our sympathy in this sad hour.


March 28, 1901

REED. Will Reed, of Knoxville, died last week from consumption. He volunteered in the war with Spain but was discharged on account or ill health. He was a very popular young man.

GIBSON. David Gibson, of Henderson's Springs, died Sunday March 24, at 4 p.m., from an abscess of the stomach. He was one of the survivors of the ill fated Sultana and was never given a pension by the government. He was interred in the Pleasant Hill Cemetery Monday afternoon.

DIXON. James Dixon, of Middle Creek, died Sunday night March 24 after a lingering suffering from cancer.



April 10, 1901

SHULTS. Hanna Shults, one of the oldest ladies of Sevier County, died Tuesday, March 26th, 1901, at the home of her son, W. H. Shults, Esq., of Pigeon Forge. Mrs. Shults was a member of the M. E. Church was was highly esteemed as a devoted Christian lady.


May 8, 1901

WHALEY. Zach Whaley, of Brier, died Saturday night May 4, after a brief illness from fever.

CARVER. Jacob Carver, of the sixth district, died at the home of W. A. Robeson Wednesday evening May 1.


June 12, 1901

LOVEDAY. Lizzie Loveday, of Harrisburg, died Thursday night, June 6th, 1901, after a lingering illness from fever. Leaving four children without a mother's care. She was interred Friday afternoon in the Walnut Grove Cemetery.

RENEAU. Ola, the seventeen year old daughter of N. P. Reneau, of Eldee, died Saturday night, June 1st, 1901, at 8 o'clock, after a brief illness from pneumonia. She was interred in the Bethel Cemetery Sunday afternoon. Services by Rev. P. M. Shaw.

RANDLES. Betsey Randles, of Boyd's Creek, died Sunday, June 9th, 1901, lacking only one day of being 94 years of age.


June 19, 1901

ATCHLEY. Nancy, wife of B. M. Atchley, died Friday June 14, at 8 p.m., after a lingering illness, and was interred in the Alder Branch Cemetery Saturday afternoon. Mrs. Atchley was a Christian lady, a devoted wife an obliging neighbor loved and respected by all who knew her.

RAMBO. Harve Rambo, of Knox county, was killed by a moving train on the Little River Bridge between Knoxville and Maryville last week. It is thought that he jumped before the train with suicidal intent.

CATON. John R. Caton, of Middle Creek, died Wednesday night June 12, after a lingering illness and was buried in the Middle Creek Cemetery Friday morning. Mr. Caton was an exemplary citizen and leaves a wife and 9 children, four or whom three sons and a daughter, reside in Texas.

RIMEL. Deats, the nine year old daughter of Houston Rimel, died Saturday night. She had been laid up with fever and took hemorrhage of the lungs.

ROBERTS. Mrs. Rachel Roberts, of Middle Creek, one of the oldest and most highly respected ladies of our county, died at her home Sunday night, June 16th, 1901, after a lingering illness.

SUSAN ROBERTS. Susan Roberts, wife of L. A. Roberts, of Wear's Valley, was born Oct. 1, 1851, and died May 29, 1901. She professed saving faith in her Savior at the tender age of 16 years and soon afterwards joined the Methodist Episcopal Church. Sister Roberts was a daughter of Richard and Sallie Clabaugh and was married to L. A. Roberts on the 19th of August 1880 with whom she lived happily until her death. She leaves behind her three boys who can only say, "I have no mother now, she has left me here alone." Like al good mothers she was very much devoted to her children and during the first part of her last illness she seemed to be troubled at the thought of leaving her boys here in this cold hearted world subject to its temptations and trials without the love and advice of a mother. For about seven weeks before her death she could only talk in a whisper and it took considerable effort to make herself understood where she said to her husband and children "I would give all the world were it mine, if I could only talk to you concerning this life and the life which is to come." But later on she became perfectly resigned to the will of her Heavenly Father saying to her friends not to grieve after her for she would be better off than they were. After suffering for more than six months with that much dreaded disease consumption, she finally said she was anxious for the time to come when she would be delivered and fell asleep in the arms of Jesus, closing her eyes on the things of this world to open them in Glory. On the following day sister Roberts was laid to rest beneath the flowers in the Mattox Cemetery surrounded by a large assembly of friends and relatives. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. D. Lawson.


June 26, 1901

EMERT. Malinie Catherine, wife of F. L. Emert, of Pigeon Forge, died Wednesday morning, June 19th, 1901. Mrs. Emert had been suffering from a cancer and death was not unexpected. She leaves a husband and four children, three sons and a daughter who will keenly feel the loss of a devoted wife and an indulgent mother, earth's purest, noblest, dearest and best friend. She was interred in the Middle Creek Cemetery Thursday, services by A. B. McKenzie.

GOSSETT. An eight-months-old child of H. C. Gossett, of Boyd's Creek, died Saturday night, June 22d, 1901.



July 3, 1901

BURNETT. Fannie, the four year old daughter of Houston Burnett, of Boyd's Creek, died Sunday afternoon and was buried in the Trundle Cemetery Monday.


July 10, 1901

BOWERS. Agness Wickfield, the sweet little daughter of W. A. and Dixie Lee Bowers died Tuesday night, July 2d, 1901, near midnight, at the age of 17 months and one day. She was laid to rest Wednesday afternoon in the Riverside Cemetery. A short but impressive service was conducted by the residence by Rev. W. W. Pyott and H. B. Clapp, and at the grave Rev. W. W. Pyott performed the ritual service of his church.

BULL. Miss Mattie Bull, daughter of W. G. Bull, of the 8th district, died Monday morning, after a brief illness. She was a member of the Baptist Church and was a popular and efficient teacher. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. H. B. Clapp.


July 17, 1901

LOVE. Lola, the sweet little daughter of Andy and Mary Love, who had been quite ill for some weeks died Thursday July 11 at 3 a.m. She was a beautiful friendly child, prized by her parents and esteemed by all who knew her. She was interred in the Alder Branch Cemetery Thursday afternoon. A short, solemn and impressive service was held at the residence by Rev. H. B. Clapp and W. W. Pyott. Services at the Cemetery were conducted by Rev. H. B. Clapp. The little grave was covered with beautiful and fragrant flowers woven into lovely wreaths by loving hands. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of all the community.

PATTERSON. Mrs. Martha Patterson, of Greeneville, last child of President Andrew Johnson died Wednesday, July 10, at the home of her son Andrew Johnson Patterson, in her 73rd year having been born Oct. 25, 1828. She was the last of President Johnson's children and was a highly cultured and deservedly popular lady.

GILBERT. Clara, daughter of James Gilbert, of Boyd's Creek, died Wednesday July 10 at 4 p.m., after a brief illness from flux.

MAPLES. Martha Juda, the little daughter of Dan and Polly Maples, died at the home of her grandfather Enoch Hurst Wednesday July 10 at 6 a.m.

MATTHEWS. An infant daughter of J. E. Matthews, of East Fork, died last week.


July 24, 1901

CANNON. Wm. H. Cannon, whose death was mentioned last week, was born March 12, 1817, in the very room in which he died Tuesday morning, July 16th, 1901. When the war of the rebellion broke our in 1861 he was a prominent and successful merchant, farmer, having a stock of goods valued at $10,000, several slaves valued at a thousand dollars each and unlimited credit with the wholesalers of the east. He linked his fortunes with the seceding states. His store and contents went up in flames. His slaves were freed, and when after the close of that bloody conflict, he returned home, he found nothing left but his farm and was compelled to start life anew. But with his characteristic industry and business tact he set to work to adapt himself to the new surroundings and was soon again in good circumstances. Mr. Cannon was twice married and both companions dieing early. He leaves two children, Miss Bettie Cannon, who has made her home with her father and giving him every needed attention through all his declining years, and J. G. Cannon who is well known to our readers as a high-toned gentleman and a successful farmer and trader. Mr. Cannon was one of the most beneficent gentleman of his time, as will be attested by many people who have been the recipients of his beneficence. While a gentleman of refinement and culture, and in favor of morality, he never made a profession of religion until the spring of 1900, when he joined the M. E. Church, South. No one doubts the genuineness of his conversion and many friends rejoice that having left these low grounds of sorrow, he has gone to a brighter, better world above. A solemn and impressive service was held at the residence Wednesday morning, conducted by Rev. W. W. Pyott, who was assisted by Revs. Mr. Wallace and D. F. Manly, after which the remains were viewed by many sorrowing relatives and sympathizing friends. He was buried in the Trundle Cemetery near Boyd's Creek, the ritual service of the M. E. Church South, being performed by Rev. W. W. Pyott. The grave was covered with beautiful flowers and relatives and friends turned sorrowfully away. He left his impress upon his country and we feel that the world is better for his having lived in it.

DICKINSON. Colonel Perez Dickinson, of Knoxville, one of the best known and most highly respected citizens of East Tennessee, died at his home in Knoxville, Wednesday, July 17, 1901, at 2:18 p.m., in his eighty-ninth year, having been born at Amherst, Mass., Feb. 13th 1813. He was immensely successful in his business enterprises and years ago retired from active business operations, but has always taken a keen interest in everything pertaining to the upbuilding of Knoxville and East Tennessee.

HODGES. Wesley, the sixteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Hodges, of the Fourth district, died Tuesday morning, July 16th, 1901, after an illness of ten days from fever. He was interred in the Red Bank Cemetery in the afternoon. The family have our sympathy in this sad bereavement.

OGLE. Sarah, wife of T. S. Ogle, of Knoxville, died at the home of her father, W. W. Webb, of Jay Ell, Friday morning, July 19th, 1901, after a lingering illness from consumption.

BIRD. Mrs. Cam Bird, of Millican, died Friday morning July 19th, 1901.

RICHARDS. Mrs. Anderson Richards, of Millican, died Friday morning, July 19th, 1901.

MOORE. A three month old daughter of Gideon and Ida Moore, of Henry's Cross Roads, died Wednesday afternoon July 17th, 1901, from meningitis.


July 31, 1901

LEAK. John R. Leak, of Catlettsburg, died Wednesday, July 24th, 1901, at 9 p.m., after a lingering illness and was buried in the Alder Branch Cemetery Thursday afternoon with Masonic honors.

McMAHAN. Mary, daughter of Alf McMahan (colored) died Wednesday, July 24th, 1901, at 4 p.m. after a brief illness from fever.

NORTON. Mrs. George Norton, died Thursday morning, July 25, 1901 after a lingering illness from paralysis. She was interred in the Shiloh Cemetery Thursday afternoon, services by Rev. H. B. Clapp.

RENO. Patten Reno, an old and highly respected citizen, died at his home one mile east of town Thursday, July 25th, 1901, at 4 p.m., in his 88th year, having been born Sept. 3d, 1813, he was interred in the River Side Cemetery Friday morning, services by Rev. W. W. Pyott.

WALKER. Lawrence Gibson, the bright little four year old boy of J. L. Walker, of Fair Garden, died at 1 p.m., Friday, July 26th, 1901. Thursday he was playing on the porch at his grandma Walker's when a dog belonging to her which was kept blocked, wrapped the chain around the boy's legs throwing him headlong inflicting a wound of his head from which he died.

BAILEY. Willie Bryan, the infant daughter of Hagan and Cassie Bailey, died Friday afternoon, July 26th, 1901, after an illness of six weeks. She was born Nov. 6th, 1900. She was interred in the Alder Branch Cemetery Saturday morning, services by Rev. H. R. Clapp.

EMERT. Christian, wife of E. M. Emert, of Wear's Valley, died Saturday, July 20th, 1901, at 1:30 a.m., after a brief illness from consumption in her 39th year, having been born Aug. 3d, 1862. She was a member of the M. E. Church and leaves a husband and three daughter. She was interred in the Hatcher Cemetery, Sunday July 21st, services by Revs. J. D. Lawson and E. R. Branam.


August 7, 1901

WALKER. Mary Francis, the four year old daughter of Mrs. A. W. Walker, died Tuesday, July 30th, 1901, at 2 p.m., after a brief illness from scarlet fever. She was interred in the Brabson Cemetery Wednesday morning, services by Rev. W. W. Pyott.

GOSSETT. Henry Gossett, of the 14th district, died Wednesday, July 31st, 1901, at 9 p.m., after a brief illness.

THOMAS. Blanche, the baby of Mrs. Eliza Thomas, relict of P. H. Thomas deceased, died Thursday afternoon, Aug. 1st, 1901, after a brief illness from scarlet fever.

McKINNEY. The four year old daughter of Grant McKinney, (colored) died Tuesday night, July 30th, 1901.

STANTON. Bettie Stanton, an inmate of the county poor house, died Wednesday night, July 30th, 1901. She was near 70 years of age.

OBITUARY. On the 31st of May 1901 death visited our church and claimed for its victim one of its oldest members, Sister Sally Ogle, wife of Thomas Ogle, who have preceded her about 16 years to the home of the soul. Sister Sally Ogle was one of the consistent members of White Oak Flats Church which was constituted in June 1887, she was about 85 years old, she was the mother of 12 children, 5 boys and 7 girls. Sister Sally leaves 11 children behind to mourn the loss of a mother, she was a kind and an affectionate mother, good neighbor, having a great love for everybody, she loved her church always filling her seat. When she was old she suffered great affliction and as she came near to death she almost forgot everything she ever knew but her Savior and Heaven and the place she gained a hope in Christ. Her seat will always be vacant in our church and we will greatly miss her presence, but we hope that our loss will be her eternal gain. Resolved, That this be spread on our church book and a copy be given her children, and sent to our county paper. R. S. Ogle, J. M. McCarter, Com.


August 14, 1901

KEAR. Annie, the two year old daughter of John Kear, Jr., of Harrisburg, died Monday night, Aug. 5th, 1901, after a brief illness from fever.

CONATSER. An infant daughter of Lavater Conatser, of Harrisburg, died Monday night, Aug. 5th, 1901, from fever.

ROBINSON -- Miss -- -- -- -- -, daughter of John Robinson of the 9th district died Friday, Aug. 2nd, 1901, from fever.

BEAMAN. Mrs. Beaman, of Knoxville, who had come to Line Spring in search of health, died at that place Wednesday night, Aug. 7.


August 21, 1901

EARLY. An infant son of W. W. Early, of Harrisburg, died Thursday morning, August 15th, 1901, and was interred in the Murphy Chapel Cemetery Friday morning, services by Rev. W. W. Pyott.

MAPLES. An infant child of William Maples died Wednesday morning, August 14th, 1901.

LANE. Rosco, son of Amanda Lane, of Knoxville, died at the residence of Ben Hall, Thursday, August 15th, 1901.

SNEED. Josie, little daughter of Hattie Sneed, died Wednesday afternoon, August 14th, 1901.

ROMINES. A little son of S. H. Romines, of Allensville, died Friday, Aug. 16th, 1901. It was interred in the Jones Cemetery Saturday, services by Rev. I. H. Reneau and E. M. Wynn.


August 28, 1901.

TROTTER. Adie, wife of A. B. Trotter, of Walden, died Tuesday, Aug. 20th, 1901, after a lingering illness. She was a daughter of I. L. Andes, a member of the M. E. Church, and a lady highly esteemed by all who knew her. She was interred in the Shiloh Cemetery Wednesday, services by Rev. J. B. Seaton and E. M. Wynn. Her husband and four children have the sympathy of the entire community.

THURMAN. Roy, son of J. C. Thurman, Esq., of the 7th district, died Wednesday, Aug. 21st, 1901, after an illness of three days from scarlet fever. Funeral services at Eden Thursday by Rev. I. H. Reneau.



September 4, 1901

SHARP. Rebecca, wife of Capt. James Sharp, of Trundle's Cross Roads, died Wednesday morning August 28th at the advanced age of 89. She had been unwell for sometime and her death was not unexpected. She was an estimable lady, loved and esteemed by all who knew her. She was interred the following day in the Uceba Cemetery, services by Rev. W. W. Pyott.

ROWAN. Pop Rowan, died at her home five miles east of Maryville, Aug. 17, at the advanced age of 82. She was born and raised near Sevierville and has many friends who knew her when she lived here. She was a sister of J. M. Rambo, of Henderson's Springs, and R. M. Rambo, of Middle Creek. She was the mother of P. B. Love. Mr. Love went to the funeral arriving after the services conducted by Prof. Wilson, President of Maryville College had been concluded and just as the lid of the casket was about to be closed for the last time.

Obituary of SARAH OGLE. Sarah Ogle, wife of E. W. Ogle was born April 23, 1848, died August 9th, 1901. She was married to Rev. E. W. Ogle, Aug. 25, 1867. She leaves a husband, a mother and five children and a host of friends to mourn her loss, but we mourn not as one who has no hope, for she professed faith in Christ in her eleventh year, and joined the White Oak Flats Baptist Church and lived an excellent member till God called her home. The Church will greatly miss her, for she filled her place in the Church. Specially ministering at the alter of prayer having a great interest in the salvation of lost sinners, giving them her instructions. But her work was finished and she entered on her reward. Sister Sarah was a good wife having a great love for her husband. She has stood by Brother Ogle for more than twenty years, like a wall of defense, and help in his ministry. She was a good mother, having a great love for her children. We commend the husband and children and friends to God Who doeth all things well. Resolved, that we bow in humble submission to the Allwise Creator who doeth all things after the counsel of His own will. Resolved, that a copy of this be spread on our Church Book, and a copy be given to Brother Ogle, also a copy be sent to our county paper for publication. H. B. Kear, Joel Watson, D. B. Ogle, Com.


September 18, 1901

PRESIDENT MCKINLEY DEAD! Passes Away at 2:14 A.M. Saturday. Funeral at Canton, Ohio, Thursday. President McKinley died at 2:15 a.m., Saturday from the effects of the shots of the anarchist Czolgozs, which he received Friday, Sept. 6th, 1901. Encouraging news came from Buffalo up to Thursday afternoon when a turn came for the worst and, each succeeding dispatch made more emphatic the sad reality that the end was near. It came as peacefully as the sitting of a summer sun. His last words being, "It it God's will." "Let His will not ours be done." After lying in state in Washington the allotted time, the body will be taken to Canton, O for interment and appropriate services will be held throughout the country Thursday the day of burial. Vice President Roosevelt took the oath of office of President of the United States Saturday afternoon. After being sworn in he announced that he expected to carry our the policy of President McKinley for the prosperity and peace of the country and requested the members of McKinley Cabinet to retain their positions, to which all of them consented.


September 25, 1901

MURPHY. W. C. Murphy, who has been in feeble health for some time died Sunday afternoon. Services were conducted at the M. E. Church, South, Tuesday, at 10 a.m., by Rev. W. W. Pyott and others, after which Mountain Star Lodge No. 197, F. & A.M., took charge and conveyed the remains to Murphy's Chapel Cemetery, where he was interred with Masonic honors. Mr. Murphy was an exemplary citizen. By industry and economy he had amassed a considerable fortune. But he was liberal to all benevolent subjects, giving liberally to the church and to the schools. He assisted in organizing the Sevier County Sunday School Convention, and until taken ill and unable to attend was always present at its sessions. He was one of the leaders in founding Murphy College and was elected President of the Board of Trustees, which position he filled until his death. He was a man of strong convictions, so much so that he was often considered cranky, but no one ever doubted his honesty. He was a devoted husband, an indulgent father and a real neighbor. His place in the church and in the community will be difficult to fill.


October 2, 1901

HODGES. Sallie, wife of Alvin Hodges, died Tuesday, Sept. 25th, 1901, after a lingering illness from consumption. She was interred at Beach Spring Cemetery the following day. Services by Rev. O. L. Underwood.

YARBERRY. Vola, daughter of Dr. J. L. Yarberry, died last week from scarlet fever.

FOX. Mrs. C. W. Fox gave birth to a boy baby Friday morning about one o'clock. The little fellow lived until five o'clock in the afternoon and died.

LYLE. T. E. Lyle, formerly of this county, died at his home in Knoxville, Friday night. He was brought back to this county Saturday and interred Sunday.

LOVEDAY. James Roosevelt Lester, little son of W. C. and Hettie Loveday, died Sept. 22d, 1901, and interred in the Glenwood Baptist Church Cemetery. Services by Rev. C. L. Wood, Sept. 24. Age 11 mo. 3 days.


October 9, 1901.

CAUGHRON. T. O. Caughron, of Eldee, died Thursday, Oct. 3d, 1901, at 6 p.m., after a lingering illness. Mr. Caughron was an industrious, honorable citizen and had many friends who regret his death.


October 16, 1901.

Christine, little daughter of J. N. Thomas of Knoxville, died Friday from tonsilitis [sic]. It was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery Saturday afternoon. Mack and Miss Nettie Thomas went down to the funeral.

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